University of St Andrews
 
 
Sea Mammal Research Unit

SMRU News Centre

item 316
[11-11-2010 to 31-12-2010]


News Item:
UK Marine Science Strategy Report

The report on UK Marine Science Strategy prepared by the Marine Science Coordination Committee (MSCC) earlier this year.  It can be downloaded free of charge from the link below.

see here for further details
contact: Prof David Paterson


 

SMRU News Archive:

Opportunities

Blogs



Upcoming Events
  • BSRC Seminar Series: Tracking the proton pathways in respiratory enzymes of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily: Insights from the structure-based simulations
    speaker: Dr Andrei Pisliakov (University of Dundee)

    building: Purdie Building
    room: Lecture Theatre D
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Dr John Mitchell

    refID: 1447

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  • Distinguished Lecture Series: Systems Biology: Morphisms of Reaction Networks that Couple Structure to Function
    speaker: Luca Cardelli (Microsoft Research and University of Oxford)

    building: Other
    room: Lower College Hall
    see also: additional details
    host/contact:

    The mech­an­isms under­ly­ing com­plex bio­lo­gical sys­tems are routinely rep­res­en­ted as net­works. Net­work kin­et­ics is widely stud­ied, and so is the con­nec­tion between net­work struc­ture and beha­vior. But it is the rela­tion­ships between net­work struc­tures that can reveal sim­il­ar­ity of mechanism.

    We define morph­isms (map­pings) between reac­tion net­works that estab­lish struc­tural con­nec­tions between them. Some morph­isms imply kin­etic sim­il­ar­ity, and yet their prop­er­ties can be checked stat­ic­ally on the struc­ture of the net­works. In par­tic­u­lar we can determ­ine stat­ic­ally that a com­plex net­work will emu­late a sim­pler net­work: it will repro­duce its kin­et­ics for all cor­res­pond­ing choices of reac­tion rates and ini­tial con­di­tions. We use this prop­erty to relate the kin­et­ics of many com­mon bio­lo­gical net­works of dif­fer­ent sizes, also relat­ing them to a fun­da­mental pop­u­la­tion algorithm. Thus, struc­tural sim­il­ar­ity between reac­tion net­works can be revealed by net­work morph­isms, elu­cid­at­ing mech­an­istic and func­tional aspects of com­plex net­works in terms of sim­pler networks.


    refID: 1449

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  • CBD Seminar Series: Evolutionary ecology of life-histories in the wild: from polyandry to migration
    speaker: Prof Jane Reid (University of Aberdeen, School of Biological Sciences)

    building: Harold Mitchell
    room: Dyers Brae Seminar Room
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Dr Maria Dornelas

    Overarching objectives in evolutionary ecology are to understand the genetic and environmental causes of variation in life-history among individual population members, and to understand the consequences of such variation for population dynamics and persistence. The causes of variation in reproductive strategies, dispersal and migration are of particular interest, because these life-history components shape the dynamics of alleles and individual organisms in time and space.
     
    In her talk, Prof Reid will illustrate how she use long-term studies of wild bird populations to quantify the causes and consequences of individual variation in reproductive and movement strategies. First, she will use quantitative genetic approaches to estimate genetic (co)variances underlying extra-pair reproduction in song sparrows, thereby quantifying forces that might maintain female multiple mating (polyandry). Second, she will illustrate relationships between migration, reproductive success and survival in European shags, thereby investigating the processes that might maintain variation in migration strategy.


    refID: 1450

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  • Environmental Change Research Group: Bogs and woodlands at the uttermost part of the Earth
    speaker: Professor Keith Bennett (Queens University Belfast)

    building: Irvine Building
    room: Forbes Room (room 409)
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: khr

    Keith Bennett has been Professor of Late-Quaternary Environmental Change
    at Queen’s University Belfast since 2007, following eight years as
    Professor of Quaternary Geology at Uppsala University. He has been
    working on the spread of trees on continental scales for many years,
    with fieldwork experience across the world. He is interested in all
    aspects of the interplay of evolutionary and ecological factors in
    controlling the distribution of organisms, using ancient DNA and pollen
    data. He received a Royal Society - Wolfson Research Merit Award in
    2007, and was elected Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2011.


    refID: 1451

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  • SOI seminar: From local habitat to global climate change: the scale of influences on the ecology of coastal marine communities.
    speaker: Prof Michael Burrows (SAMS - The Scottish Association for Marine Science)

    building: SOI
    room: Gatty Lecture theatre
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Prof Ian Johnston

    refID: 1436

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  • I-POWER Lecture Series: Evolution: the Quaternary tale
    speaker: Professor Keith Bennett (Queens University Belfast)

    building: Other
    room: United College, School 1
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: khr

    This lecture series and will be followed by a reception in room 310 of the Irvine Building.

    Timing: 3-4.30pm, Thursday 27th November 2014
    Place: School 1 lecture theatre

    Darwin’s On the Origin of Species has led to a theory of evolution with
    a mass of empirical detail on population genetics below species level,
    together with heated debate on the details of macroevolutionary patterns
    above species level. Most of the main principles are clear and generally
    accepted, notably that life originated once and has evolved over time by
    descent with modification.
    However, the last two million years (Quaternary period) have been a
    period of especially high amplitude environmental change across the
    Earth, culminating in continental-scale glaciation in the northern
    hemisphere. The periodicity of this change is much higher frequency
    (20-40[-100] thousand years) than the intervals between lineage splits
    for most multicellular taxa (often millions of years or longer), and
    much higher amplitude than earlier in Earth history. Yet environmental
    change of the Quaternary is typical used to 'explain' speciation events
    and higher order lineage splits.
    The fossil and molecular phylogenetic records of the response of life on
    Earth to Quaternary climatic changes indicate that the evolution of
    diversity can best understood in terms of nonlinear dynamics of the
    relationship between genotype and phenotype, and between climate and
    environments. The Earth’s biodiversity is in a state of continuous
    increase and shows, continuously, discrepancies between genetic and
    morphological data in time and space. The high amplitude and high
    frequency changes of the Quaternary have surprisingly little impact on
    this pattern.

    Biography: Keith Bennett has been Professor of Late-Quaternary Environmental Change
    at Queen’s University Belfast since 2007, following eight years as
    Professor of Quaternary Geology at Uppsala University. He has been
    working on the spread of trees on continental scales for many years,
    with fieldwork experience across the world. He is interested in all
    aspects of the interplay of evolutionary and ecological factors in
    controlling the distribution of organisms, using ancient DNA and pollen
    data. He received a Royal Society - Wolfson Research Merit Award in
    2007, and was elected Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2011.
     


    refID: 1452

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  • BSRC Seminar Series: High-throughput decoding of drug-resistance and virulence mechanisms in African trypanosomes
    speaker: Prof. David Horn (College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee)

    building: BMS
    room: Lecture Theatre
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Prof Terry Smith

    refID: 1397

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  • Linux for Genomics Course at the University of Edinburgh
    speaker: (University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Genomics)

    building: Other
    room:
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Dr Daniel Barker

    LINUX FOR GENOMICS COURSE
    Wednesday 21 January 2015, 09:00 - 17:00, University of Edinburgh

    This 1-day workshop is specifically aimed at people without any command-line experience.

    The following topics will be covered: - Introduction to Linux - Getting out of trouble - File system - File manipulation - Accessing files - Pipes and redirects - Filtering / manipulating file content - Shell scripts - Process management - BEDTools - bioawk - seqtk - SAMtools - tabix

    More information about this workshop, including how to register, can be found at here.

    Daniel Barker


    refID: 1446

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