University of St Andrews
 
 
Sea Mammal Research Unit

Sea Mammal Research Unit: Past seminars

25 Aug 2014
1:00 PM
MBS
Seminar Room 1

Tumour microenvironment: Putting Lung Cancer in context
Prof Tariq Sethi
King's College London

click for details

19 Aug 2014
12:00 PM
BMS
Lecture Theatre

CANCELLED/BSRC Seminar Series: Practical and Research Skills in Life Sciences - numbers and cost versus quality
Professor Richard J Reece
University of Manchester, Gene Regulation and Cellular Biotechnology

click for details

08 Aug 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Biodiversity lessons from the Amazon River Basin: A two-part fish story
Prof Carlos E. C. Freitas and Prof Lawrence E. Hurd
Federal University of Amazonas and Washington & Lee University

click for details

Carlos E. C. Freitas is a full professor at the Federal University of Amazonas and a visiting professor at Washington & Lee University.  He is a freshwater biologist and his main research area includes fish ecology, population dynamics and inland fisheries.  He is the head of several research projects supported by Brazilian agencies and has published papers in journals such as Ecological Modeling, Hydrobiologia, Ecology of Freshwater Fish, Ecological Engineering, and Fisheries Management and Ecology

 

Lawrence E. Hurd is the Herwick Professor of Biology at Washington & Lee University.  He is an ecologist, with primary research interests in the role of apex predators in arthropod assemblages of terrestrial ecosystems, and in the structure and dynamics of tropical fish assemblages in the Amazon River Basin of Brazil.  He has published in journals such as Science, Ecology, J. Animal Ecology, Oecologia, and Environmental Entomology.

 

Also visiting with Profs Reitas and Hurd is Flavia K. Siqueira-Souza who is an associate professor at the Federal University of Amazonas.  She is a freshwater biologist and her primary research field is fish ecology aiming to understand the key factors structuring fish assemblages in Amazonian aquatic environments.  She has published papers on this subject in journals such as Hydrobiologia and Ecology of Freshwater Fish.

 

There will be an opportunity after the lecture for anyone interested in an interactive discussion with Prof Hurd and his colleagues.  Depending on numbers, this will take place in either the Laverack or Seminar Room.

host: Mrs Jane Williamson

refID: 1378

hide details



15 Jul 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Title to be announced
Professor Peter Colman
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Biotechnology Centre, Victoria, Australia, Division of Structural Biology

click for details

03 Jul 2014
3:00 PM
Purdie Building
Lecture Theatre C

Enantiomeric Natural Products: A Marine and Terrestrial Fungi Conundrum
Prof Robert M. Williams
Colorado State

click for details

Over the course of 3-plus decades, the Williams lab have made major contributions to organic and bio-organic chemistry, through a focus on natural product synthesis. Their efforts in natural product synthesis have yielded >70 completed targets, and their asymmetric electrophilic glycine technology to amino acids was commercialised by Aldrich in the late 80’s. They have been heavily involved in the synthesis and mechanistic understanding of DNA-targeting antibiotics and antitumor agents, while they have also made numerous contributions to the elucidation of important biosynthetic pathways (perhaps most famously the Taxol biosynthesis).
 

http://rwindigo1.chem.colostate.edu/Williams_Group/Home.html

host: ek28

refID: 1377

hide details



03 Jul 2014
1:00 PM
Irvine Building
Forbes Room (room 409)

Sea-level change during glacial cycles: Geophysical, glaciological and archaeological consequences
Professor Kurt Lambeck
The Australian National University, Canberra and Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris

click for details

18 Jun 2014
10:00 AM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Nod-like Receptors in Host Defence and Inflammasome Activation
Dr Paras Anand
St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, USA

click for details

13 Jun 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI & St Andrews Bioblitz seminar: Parasites of the Plankton
Dr David Conway
The Marine Biological Association, Plymouth

click for details

This seminar will be given in connection with the St Andrews Bioblitz 2014.

http://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/biooutreach/2014/06/02/st-andrews-bioblitz-2014/

host: Mr Alan Reeve

refID: 1371

hide details



10 Jun 2014
4:00 PM
BSRC
Lecture Theatre

BSRC Seminar Series: Glycolipids as Immunomodulators
DR Brigit Stocker
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

click for details

06 Jun 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Lecture Theatre

BSRC Seminar Series: Oxidative stress responses in Gram-positive bacteria and the role of bacterial thiol-redox buffers
Dr Haike Antelmann
Institute for Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Germany

click for details

04 Jun 2014
1:00 PM
Purdie Building
Lecture Theatre B

BSRC Seminar Series: Developing human vaccines: an industrial perspective
Prof Jeff Almond
Visiting Professor, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford

click for details

Professor Jeffrey Almond holds visiting Professorships at the Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford, and the Department of Microbiology, University of Reading. He was formerly (up to 30 September 2013) Vice-President of Discovery Research and External Research and Development at Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon. Prior to that he was Head of the School of Animal and Microbial Sciences at the University of Reading. He has served on several National and International Bodies including the Government’s Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee (SEAC), chairman of the Virology Division of the International Union of Microbiological Societies, and international secretary for the Society for General Microbiology. He is currently a member of Council of the Medical Research Council, and an elected fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences.

host: Prof Richard Randall

refID: 1370

hide details



29 May 2014
4:00 PM
MBS
Seminar Room 2

Plasmodium knowlesi malaria - 10 years on
Dr Cyrus Daneshvar
Oxford University Hospitals

click for details

The simian malaria Plasmodium knowlesi has transformed our thinking of malaria in humans. Following its first description in a simian host in 1932, experimental P. knowlesi infections have been applied to fight against neurosyphilis, transitioning through a period of laboratory research for understanding the immunology of malaria and in an animal model for vaccination development.  Most recently P. knowlesi  has been identified as the fifth cause of malaria in humans.

P. knowlesi transmission is restricted to Southeast Asia. In areas within Malaysia knowlesi malaria accounts for the highest incidence of all malaria cases. Furthermore, cases are described over a vast geographical range in South East Asia and in non-endemic countries where travellers to Southeast Asia have acquired the infection before returning home. Although the disease spectrum is not yet fully appreciated, P. knowlesi is frequently a cause of severe malaria.

The discovery of a large focus of P. knowlesi in the human population in 2004 was followed by a flurry of clinical research to produce information for healthcare professionals. The clinical aspects of knowlesi malaria will be presented, bringing the audience up-to-date with our current understanding on this newly described and potentially life threatening disease.

Cyrus Daneshvar is a registrar in respiratory medicine with special interest in lung cancer and interventional pulmonology. He is currently with the Oxford Deanery. Cyrus graduated from Birmingham University in 1999 and worked for six months in South Africa and Mozambique before completing his general medical training. After a brief period in Malawi and obtaining a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in London, he joined a Wellcome Trust Funded study in the Malaria Research Centre, University of Malaysia Sarawak. In Sarawak Cyrus established a field study site in a remote rural hospital where he recruited malaria patients and produced the first detailed clinical descriptions of P. knowlesi infections in the human population. The descriptions appear in clinical guidelines and texts for the diagnosis and treatment of zoonotic malaria.  In 2013 Cyrus successfully defended his Medical doctorate on knowlesi malaria, St George's University of London and will take up a Consultants post in respiratory medicine in Plymouth later this year. Cyrus maintains a keen interest in malaria alongside his daily work as a respiratory physician.

host: Dr Janet Cox-Singh

refID: 1344

hide details



29 May 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Vocal production learning in captive grey seals AND Vulnerability and Adaptation of Scottish Island Communities to the Impacts of Climate Change.
Amanda Stansbury AND Fiona Cunningham
University of St Andrews

click for details

29 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Transition states and protein dynamics in enzymatic reactions
Dr Rafael Guimaraes Da Silva
Pfizer Inc, USA

click for details

27 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Structural characterization of the intermediate steps of enveloped virus fusion
Dr Juan Fontana
Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA

click for details

23 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Early detection of viral RNA structures and dinucleotide content by host cells
Dr Jeroen Witteveldt
Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh

click for details

22 May 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar:Biodiversity, Ecosystem Functioning and Economic Value of Saltmarshes in the Eden Estuary AND Does sonar ramp-up reduce the risk of exposure to high intensity sound? An experimental evaluation with humpback whales.
Kate Wade AND Paul Wensveen
University of St Andrews

click for details

21 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Industrial biocatalysis – riding the wave of success
Prof. Tom Moody
Almac, Northern Ireland

click for details

20 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Innate and Epigenetic Control of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection
Dr Michael Nevels
Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, University of Regensburg

click for details

19 May 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - How and why you should review papers for scientific journals
Dr Sue Healy

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skils workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1302

hide details



16 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Interrogating the relationship between RNA virus infection and host SUMOylation
Dr David Hughes
School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds

click for details

15 May 2014
4:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Gold Nanoparticles in Biomedicine: Delivery and Sensing
Professor Vince Rotello
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

click for details

Abstract: A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling how they interact with themselves and with the outer world. Our research program focuses on the tailoring of nanoparticles of surfaces for a variety of applications, coupling the atomic-level control provided by organic synthesis with the fundamental principles of supramolecular chemistry. Using these engineered nanoparticles, we are developing particles for biological applications, in particular delivery and sensing. This talk will focus on the interfacing of nanoparticles with biosystems, and will discuss our use of nanoparticles for delivery applications including our studies of small molecule, nucleic acid, and protein delivery. This presentation will also feature the use of nanoparticles for diagnostic applications, including the use of array-based sensing paradigms for the detection and identification of cancer.

http://www.chem.umass.edu/faculty/rotello.html

host: Prof Jim Naismith

refID: 1360

hide details



15 May 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Big plankton and the largest migrations on Earth
Clare Webster
University of St Andrews

click for details

15 May 2014
1:00 PM
MBS
Lecture theatre

Cerebral asymmetry and language development: are they linked and if so how?
Prof Dorothy Bishop
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford

click for details

We know that language function in the human brain is usually lateralized to the left hemisphere, but we don’t know how or why. A popular view is that cerebral asymmetry facilitates language acquisition by enabling the two hemispheres to adopt complementary roles in cognitive processing. A related idea is that developmental language disorders may be the consequence of a failure to develop cerebral lateralization, but until lately evidence has been weak and indirect. I will present data from a series of studies confirming that language difficulties in children are associated with a lack of the usual bias to left-hemisphere language. I will discuss whether such results can be accommodated within a genetic model of cerebral asymmetry.

Dorothy Bishop studied Experimental Psychology at Oxford University before going on to complete an M.Phil in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry in 1975 and D.Phil at the Neuropsychology Unit in the Radcliffe Infirmary. She was for 20 years funded by the Medical Research Council, first in Oxford, and then at the universities of Newcastle upon Tyne and Manchester, and at the MRC Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge.  In 1998, she moved to the Department of Experimental Psychology in Oxford, where she is funded by a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellowship, and heads a programme of research into children’s communication impairments.  She has published over 400 papers receiving more than 26500 cumulative citations. Dorothy is a founding member of the RALLIcampaign, aimed at raising awareness about language disorders https://www.youtube.com/user/RALLIcampaign

She is a Fellow of the British Academy, and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and this year has been elected Fellow of the Royal Society.

In addition she writes a popular blog on a range of academic-related topics http://deevybee.blogspot.co.uk/

host: Dr Silvia Paracchini

refID: 1163

hide details



14 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

CANCELLED/BSRC Seminar Series: Thermostabilisation of G protein coupled receptors for structural studies and drug discovery
Dr Fiona Marshall
Heptares Therapeutics

click for details

08 May 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Genetic diversity in salmonid populations: The role of life history diversity and habitat fragmentation
Prof Daniel Ruzzante
Dalhousie University

click for details

Atlantic salmon exhibit an anadromous life history where individuals migrate out to sea where they spend a year or longer before returning to their natal grounds to reproduce. Some individuals, however, mature as parr without going out to sea. In this presentation I will describe evidence of the role played by parr maturation in the maintenance of genetic diversity in Atlantic salmon. I will also describe our efforts to understand how habitat fragmentation and the spatial configuration of populations affect the distribution of genetic diversity in fragmented freshwater systems.

http://myweb.dal.ca/ruzzante/

host: Prof Oscar Gaggiotti

refID: 1322

hide details



07 May 2014
4:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Function and Regulation of Enzymes of the Ubiquitin System
Dr Thimo Kurz
MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit, University of Dundee

click for details

07 May 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

“From Waves to Whales” – Science stories from our recent Biology Student Antarctic Expedition
Various
University of St Andrews, School of Biology

click for details

In March 2014 seven Senior Honours and six Masters students from Biology embarked on an educational expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula and the Antarctic Polar Circle. During this lunch time seminar the students will share some of their scientific findings, expedition highlights and WOW moments in form of short presentations and a slide show. All students and staff are invited to join the intrepid explores for some first-hand tales of this incredible polar adventure.
 

http://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/antarctic/

host: Dr Sonja Heinrich

refID: 1356

hide details



07 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Uncovering the role of interferon lambda in antiviral defence
Prof. Peter Staheli
University of Freiberg

click for details

06 May 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Adaptation, Diversification, and Range Shifts: Case Studies in Plants and Insects
Dr Lesley Lancaster
Aberdeen University

click for details

My research focuses on the evolution of realized and fundamental niches, evolution under climate change, and evolutionary processes associated with geographic range limits. I am interested in how social and behavioral factors interact with changing ecological conditions to faciliate or hinder evolutionary change, and I am also investigating macroevolutionary/phylogenetic processes associated with geographic range shifts and habitat shifts. Finally, I am interested in the formation and maintenance of Mediterranean biomes.

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/sbs/people/profiles/lesleylancaster

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1332

hide details



06 May 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Bacteriophage Therapy and Biology - Old, New and Synthetic Approaches
Prof. Mark Enright
Visiting Professor at Dept. of Chemistry, Bath University and Indendent Consultant, Synthetic Genomics Vaccine Inc., CA, USA

click for details

01 May 2014
9:00 AM
Other
Physics Lecture Theatre A and foyer

Third Annual Biology Research Symposium
Plenary Speaker: Prof Paul Sharp, FRS
University of Edinburgh

click for details

Please e-mail js16 for programme

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1304

hide details



30 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Specificity and disease in the ubiquitin system
Dr Helen Walden
College of Life Sciences, Dundee

click for details

29 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Ecological and evolutionary consequences of host-parasite interactions in red grouse
Prof Stuart Piertney
Aberdeen University

click for details

22 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Menopause and intra-genomic conflict
Dr Francisco Ubeda
Royal Holloway

click for details

Menopause is the transition from reproductive to non-reproductive life well before natural death. Rather than involving a smooth, rapid change, it is normally preceded by a long period of erratic hormonal fluctuations that are accompanied by a plethora of unpleasant symptoms. Here we suggest that this turbulent period owes to a conflict of interest, between a woman’s maternally-inherited and paternally-inherited genes, over the trade-off between personal reproduction and cooperative care of neighbours’ young. We formulate a mathematical model of kin selection in a demographically structured population showing that there is conflict over fertility between genes with different parental origin. We formulate two mathematical models of game theory showing that this conflict is resolved through two alternative gene expression strategies: expression of one copy and silencing of the other (classic genomic imprinting), and random expression of one copy and constant expression of the other (novel form of genomic imprinting). These two forms of conflict resolution help explaining the unpleasant symptoms of menopause. We investigate which of these symptoms are expected to be caused by the maternally-inherited versus the paternally-inherited genes. We show that demographic differences between ancestral human populations may explain the variability in age of onset of menopause, and the variability of symptoms observed among different ethnic groups during the period of time preceding menopause. Our model informs the assessment of a woman’s risk of developing osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, suggests epigenetic therapies for preventing breast and ovarian cancers, and provides guidance on family planning based upon a woman’s ancestral background.
 

http://pure.rhul.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/francisco-ubeda-de-torres%2893d9973a-b381-4aa1-84b5-7dfec8359b8b%29.html

host: andy.gardner

refID: 1330

hide details



21 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - Dealing with referees' comments on a paper and dealing with rejection
Dr Luke Rendell

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skils workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1301

hide details



17 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: The contribution of social interactions to the worldwide spread of an invasive species AND How to build a chordate: understanding ParaHox regulation.
Morelia Camacho Cervantes AND Myles Garstang
University of St Andrews

click for details

16 Apr 2014
4:00 PM
BMS
Lecture Theatre

BSRC Seminar Series: Elucidating and Engineering Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Plants
Prof. Sarah O'Connor
John Innes Centre, Norwich

click for details

16 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
BMS
Lecture Theatre

BSRC Seminar Series: New insights into malaria parasite egress from its host red blood cell
Prof. Mike Blackman
NIMR (MRC Mill Hill)

click for details

10 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar:Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) ethics policy discussion.
Dr Vincent Janik
University of St Andrews

click for details

09 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: The little rotter: sequencing, diagnostics and comparative metabolic analysis of the plant pathogen Dickeya
Dr Leighton Pritchard
James Hutton Institute

click for details

07 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - Scientific publishing - practical advice from an author, referee and journal Editor
Dr Will Cresswell

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skils workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1300

hide details



03 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar:The southern elephant seal: foraging in the deep dark of the Antarctic Ocean for luminous fish.
Dr Christophe Guinet
CEBC-CNRS, France

click for details

01 Apr 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: The Evolution of the Nervous System in Arthropods
Dr Angelika Stollewerk
Queen Mary, London

click for details

Dr Stollewerk’s research interest is the evolution of the arthropod nervous system (insects, crustaceans, myriapods, chelicerates, onychophorans).

Dr Stollewerk's group analyses the molecular and morphological modifications of developmental processes that have resulted in the formation of the diverse nervous systems in arthropods in order to understand how the developmental mechanisms have been modified in the individual arthropod groups to generate the diverse nervous systems; link evolutionary changes in developmental processes to adaptive changes in morphology and function of the nervous system and to uncover derived characters of neurogenesis that can be used for resolving euarthropod relationships.

All welcome!

http://www.sbcs.qmul.ac.uk/staff/angelikastollewerk.html

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1329

hide details



31 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - How to get a scientific paper published
Professor Anne Magurran

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skils workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1299

hide details



27 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Managing large marine ecosystems in the face of multiple challenges: The GBR World Heritage Area – a case study.
Dr Randall Owens
Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Australia

click for details

26 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
Irvine Building
Forbes Room

IPOWER Seminer: Upland waters in the UK: from acid rain to climate change
Professor Rick Battarbee (FRS)
University College London

click for details

26 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Phosphorescent imaging of biological molecules
Dr Ken Lo
City University of Hong Kong

click for details

20 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Hydrozoan jellyfish monitoring in salmon aquaculture: ongoing findings and maximizing industry compliance
Anna Kintner
SOI St Andrews

click for details

20 Mar 2014
10:00 AM
MBS
Seminar Room 2

Translational Infection Group meeting
John Kennedy

click for details

*****This week's Journal Club has been postponed due to the visit of the head of the Wellcome Trust. The Journal club will now run on the 27th of this month.******

You are invited to join the weekly translational infection group meeting each Thursday at 10.00 in The Medical School.  Our aim is to provide an opportunity for PhD students, postdoctoral researcher and principal investigators to meet, exchange hot research findings, practice public presentations, and propose novel ideas in the area of human infection.  A range of techniques from molecular biology to mathematics is being used to investigate malaria, mycobacteria, staphylococci, pneumococci and mycoplasma.

For those interested an Infection Group Journal Club shall be taking place at 10am this Thursday at the Infection Group Meeting in seminar room 2 of the Medical and Biological Sciences Building. The dates of following Journal Clubs will be Thursdays:

17 April, 22 May, 26 June, 24 July and 28 August

The paper chosen by John Kennedy (who will lead the discussion) for this coming Thursday is:

Feasibility, accuracy, and clinical effect of point-of-care Xpert
MTB/RIF testing for tuberculosis in primary-care settings in
Africa: a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

Volunteers for any of the dates listed would be much appreciated.

host: Prof Stephen Gillespie

refID: 1328

hide details



19 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Sequencing protozoan pond life in the search of new enzymes and natural products
Prof. Rob Field
John Innes Centre, Norwich

click for details

13 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: 'Informational' session on stable isotopes in the marine environment.
Nora Hanson

click for details

10 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - Planning and conducting fieldwork
Dr Carl Smith

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skils workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1298

hide details



06 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Investigating the aetiology of urogenital cancer in California sea lions AND Marine mammal molecular ecology v2.0: moving from genetics to genomics.
Helen Browning AND Emma Carroll
SOI St Andrews

click for details

05 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
MBS
Lecture Theatre MBS:155

BSRC Seminar Series : Bacterial pneumonia : from mechanisms to therapeutics
Prof. Jose Bengoechea
Queen's University, Belfast

click for details

04 Mar 2014
7:30 PM
Chemistry
Lecture Theatre

Botanical Society of Scotland lecture: Arctic–Alpine Plants in a Warmer World, an account of his recent book Tundra-Taiga Biology
Emeritus Professor Robert Crawford FRSE

click for details

04 Mar 2014
1:00 PM
Irvine Building
Forbes Room

Linking the ecology and evolution of the savanna biome
Dr Caroline Lehmann
University of Edinburgg, School of GeoSciences

click for details

Ecologists have long sought to elucidate the controls on savanna vegetation structure. In seeking universal relationships explaining tree basal area across the savannas of Africa, Australia and South America we found that directional relationships among moisture availability, fire and vegetation were universal: increasing moisture availability drives increases in fire and tree basal area, while fire reduces tree basal area. However, among continents, the magnitude of effects varied so substantially that a single model cannot adequately represent global patterns in savanna woody biomass. Biogeographical differences, a legacy of evolutionary and environmental histories, underpinned by regional variation in phylogeny, plant traits and climate, have cascading impacts driving regional variation in the contemporary functional relationships between woody vegetation, fire and climate. These same differences will determine the regional responses of vegetation to future climates, with substantial implications for changes in biome extent and global carbon stocks.

http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/abs/people/person.html?indv=3626

host: tch2

refID: 1316

hide details



27 Feb 2014
10:00 AM
MBS
Seminar Room 2

Translational Infection Group meeting

click for details

You are all invited to join the weekly translational infection group meeting each Thursday at 10.00 in The Medical School.  Our aim is to provide an opportunity for PhD students, postdoctoral researcher and principal investigators to meet, exchange hot research findings, practice public presentations, and propose novel ideas in the area of human infection.  A range of techniques from molecular biology to mathematics is being used to investigate malaria, mycobacteria, staphylococci, pneumococci and mycoplasma.  There is also a monthly journal club.   

host: Ms Marion Ponthus

refID: 1310

hide details



26 Feb 2014
5:15 PM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

Open Data and the Future of Science
Prof Geoffrey Boulton
Royal Society of Edinburgh

click for details

Professor Geoffrey Boulton

General Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Regius Professor Emeritus University of Edinburgh, and Chair of the Royal Society project Science as an Open Enterprise - the final report for which was published in June 2012.

All are welcome to the lecture which will be followed by wine and light refreshments.

host:

refID: 1296

hide details



26 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Exploring and exploiting C. elegans for whole-genome mutation profiling for genetic toxicology
Prof. Anton Gartner
University of Dundee, College of Life Sciences

click for details

24 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

PhD Student Lunchtime Chats - The importance of collaborations in Science
Professor Rick Randall

click for details

These lunchtime chats replace the week-long Science, Media and Communication Skills workshop previously held in June for postgraduate research students.

It is intended that students will have an opportunity to discuss relevant topics introduced and led by a member of staff.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1297

hide details



21 Feb 2014
4:15 PM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

Where am I coming from, where are we, where are you going?
Shay Garvey
Founding partner, Frontline Ventures

click for details

Shay is one of the most active and experienced early stage technology investors in Europe. He was part of the core team of Delta Partners that raised 4 funds and €235m between 1994-2007. He has invested in 25 early stage tech companies and achieved exits over a number of cycles. He has deep networks among investors and the entrepreneurial community in Ireland and USA.
Earlier in his career Shay worked in industry with Exxon and Corning before joining McKinsey. Shay then returned to Ireland and spent seven years in the Irish start up scene as a founder/investor in two companies and CEO of a major food exporter before joining the venture capital industry.
Shay has served on the boards of the Irish Venture Capital Association, the Trinity College Science Gallery and the Harvard Business School European Leadership Council.
 
All are welcome to the lecture which will be followed by wine and light refreshments.

http://www.frontline.vc/

host: ec36

refID: 1307

hide details



20 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Some problems in distance sampling.
Rocio Prieto Gonzalez
CREEM, University of St Andrews

click for details

- Estimating the encounter rate variance.

- Bias produced by animal movement.

- Is distance sampling unbiased?

host: Dr Dave Ferrier

refID: 1312

hide details



20 Feb 2014
10:00 AM
MBS
Seminar Room 2

Translational Infection Group meeting

click for details

You are all invited to join the weekly translational infection group meeting each Thursday at 10.00 in The Medical School.  Our aim is to provide an opportunity for PhD students, postdoctoral researcher and principal investigators to meet, exchange hot research findings, practice public presentations, and propose novel ideas in the area of human infection.  A range of techniques from molecular biology to mathematics is being used to investigate malaria, mycobacteria, staphylococci, pneumococci and mycoplasma.  There is also a monthly journal club.   

host:

refID: 1309

hide details



19 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Lecture Theatre

BSRC Seminar Series: RNA editing in kinetoplastids: ever-growing complexity
Professor Julius Lukes
Departmental Head, Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Protists, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Republic

click for details

18 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Drosophila Viruses: discovery, distribution, and evolution
Dr Darren Obbard
University of Edinburgh

click for details

Brief Abstract: Drosophila is (arguably) our primary model for antiviral immunity in arthropods. However, only a handful of viruses are known to naturally infect Drosophila, and only one (a Rhabdovirus) has been regularly isolated from wild populations. I will describe the discovery, distribution and evolutionary history several new viruses, and illustrate how these can be used as a model system to better understand host-virus co-evolution.

Dr Obbard is interested in the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. By applying population-genetic approaches to host-parasite systems, he hopes to understand how the selective pressure exerted by host-parasite interaction translates into adaptive change in the genome.

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1276

hide details



17 Feb 2014
5:15 PM
Other
Physics Lecture Theatre

James Gregory Public Lecture: Can a Scientist Trust the New Testament?
Rt Revd Prof. Tom Wright
University of St Andrews, School of Divinity

click for details

11 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Insecticide resistance and sexual antagonism in flies
Prof Nina Wedell
University of Exeter

click for details

A Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award Holder. Prof Wedell is an evolutionary biologist with research interests focused on the evolutionary ecology of sex. She has worked extensively on various aspects of sexual selection and sexual conflict, in particular on the role of selfish genetic elements in reproductive biology. Prof Wedell is the Academic lead for the Behaviour research group.

https://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/staff/index.php?web_id=nina_wedell

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1275

hide details



10 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy: taking snapshots of the living at the ultrastructural level
Dr. Yannick Schwab
European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany

click for details

Summary

Yannick will show data from his work in Cell Biology using CLEM workflow to combine confocal with SEM and TEM tomography and also in developmental biology using targeted EM of nematodes and zebrafish embryos for studies of collective cell migration and angiogenesis. He will also cover approaches to investigating metastasis models using intravital imaging in mice combined with ultrastructure of invading cancer cells.

Biography

PhD 2001, Louis Pasteur University, Strasbourg.
Postdoctoral research at the University of Calgary, Canada and at the IGBMC, Illkirch, France.
Head of Electron Microscopy at the Imaging Center, IGBMC, Illkirch, France.
Facility head and team leader at EMBL since 2012.

host: Dr John Lucocq

refID: 1289

hide details



06 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Careful with that sea squirt. What plasticity in Ciona intestinalis tells us about ecology and neurobiology
Dr Euan Brown
Heriot Watt University

click for details

06 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: Design, synthesis and biological application of molecular imaging probes with tunable chemical switches
Prof. Kazuya Kikuchi
Osaka University, Japan

click for details

05 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

CANCELLED/BSRC Seminar Series: Bacterial interspecies signalling during polymicrobial infection
Dr Robert Ryan
University of Dundee, College of Life Sciences

click for details

04 Feb 2014
4:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series: The concept of the codon constellation in paramyxoviruses
Prof. Bert Rima
Queens University Belfast

click for details

04 Feb 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar: Understanding camouflage: evolutionary biology meets computational neuroscience
Prof Innes Cuthill
University of Bristol

click for details

Prof Cuthill is a leading figure in behavioural and sensory ecology, and is currently collaborating with faculty in both the Schools of Biology and Psychology & Neuroscience to test the adaptive signficance of animal coloration and camouflage.

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1274

hide details



30 Jan 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
Gatty Lecture Theatre

SOI Seminar: Landscape scale measurements of CO2 from Flow Country Peatlands
Graham Hambley
University of St Andrews, School of Geography and Geosciences

click for details

29 Jan 2014
11:00 AM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Biology and Ecology of Global Change: A Doctoral Programme
Prof Amadeu Soares
Universidade de Aveiro

click for details

This Doctoral Program has been funded by the Portuguese Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia, and has funding for four cohorts of 12 PhD students, of which two per cohort can be co-supervised by PIs at the University of St Andrews. The Doctoral Program includes five specialization areas:
-Tropical Biology and Ecology
-Marine Biology and Ecology
-Ecology and Functional Biodiversity
-Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics
-Environmental Biology and Health
Amadeu will introduce the Doctoral Program, the facilities and partners involved, and will be available to answer questions from interested PIs and prospective candidates.
 

http://begc.biologiaatua.net/index.php/news#

host: Dr Maria Dornelas

refID: 1257

hide details



28 Jan 2014
1:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

CBD Seminar Series: What makes a successful seal? Mechanisms underlying heterozygosity fitness correlations in wild vertebrate populations
Dr Joe Hoffmann
Universität Bielefeld, Department of Animal Behaviour

click for details

Abstract:  Correlations between heterozygosity and a wealth of important fitness traits have been uncovered in natural populations using proxy-measures of genome-wide heterozygosity based typically on around ten microsatellites. However, effect sizes are typically small and the underlying mechanisms remain contentious because a handful of markers provide little power to detect inbreeding. I will outline the state of the art in this field in relation to a evolutionarily compelling group of marine mammals, the Pinnipedia.  In particular, I will draw upon recent empirical insights from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) suggesting that heterozygosity may explain more fitness variation than previously envisaged.

http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/vhf/JH/

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1243

hide details



22 Jan 2014
1:00 PM
BSRC
Seminar Room

BSRC Seminar Series : The evolutionary and immunological basis for CpG and UpA dinucleotide suppression in mammalian RNA viruses
Prof. Peter Simmonds Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh
Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh

click for details

host: rer@st-andrews.ac.uk

refID: 1229

hide details



21 Jan 2014
12:00 AM
The Observatory

4-day Statistical Modelling Workshop: Introduction to statistical modeling

click for details

STATISTICAL MODELLING WORKSHOP
Introduction to statistical modeling,
Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling,  21-24 January 2014,  University of St. Andrews

The Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling (CREEM) at the University of St. Andrews will be running a 4 day ‘Statistical Modelling’ workshop to introduce basic statistical modelling techniques. The workshop will cover Linear Models and Generalized Linear Models to help participants analyse continuous, presence/absence and count data. The course will be heavily data-based and presented using a marine mammal case study and workshop practicals will be based around an impact assessment analysis. The R software package will be used for workshop-based practicals and no prior experience with the R package is assumed. Computer sessions take place in our computer classroom (attached to the seminar room) and participants can use our computers or bring their own laptops.
For more information and registration, please visit the webpage: http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/workshops/statsmodelling2014/statsmodelling2014.html

http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/workshops/statsmodelling2014/statsmodelling2014.html

host:

refID: 1238

hide details



20 Jan 2014
9:00 AM
Other
LTA, Physics Building

Postgraduate Conference

click for details

POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE

20 and 21 JANUARY 2014

LECTURE THEATRE A, PHYSICS BUILDING, NORTH HAUGH

 

An invitation is extended to all academic staff and supervisors of postgraduate students in the School of Biology.  This is a great opportunity for both staff and students to hear about what your colleagues are doing and to support them!

 

All postgraduate students are required to attend the conference.

 

First year students will produce one slide and talk for one minute on their research project.

 

Second year students will present their research work as a poster presentation.

 

Third year students will present their research work as a talk.

 

The conference will be followed by a ceilidh on the Tuesday evening which is free to all attendees.  Tickets will be available from the registration desk during the conference.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 1203

hide details



14 Jan 2014
1:00 PM
SOI
SOI/Gatty lecture theatre

SOI seminar: Ecosystem effects of ocean acidification.
Prof Jason Hall-Spencer
University of Plymouth

click for details

04 Dec 2013
5:15 PM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

Inaugural Lecture: Trying to stop the shrinking brain: using biology, chemistry and physics to understand Alzheimer's
Professor Frank Gunn-Moore
University of St Andrews, School of Biology

click for details

The Deputy Principal and Vice Principal (Research) will take the Chair

THE LECTURE IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AND ALL ARE WELCOME

https://risweb.st-andrews.ac.uk/portal/da/persons/frank-j-gunnmoore%28b00c5dd1-3606-4696-9ce8-4504b04977bf%29.html

host:

refID: 1235

hide details



21 Nov 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: Seals in FOAM: Impact of marine mammal temperature and salinity data on ocean model fields. AND Recent development of the Forecast Ocean Assimilation Model (FOAM)
Fiona Carse AND Matthew Martin
The MetOffice

click for details

Fiona Carse

Temperature and salinity profiles are being obtained from instrumented marine mammals in near real-time. The mammals, mostly elephant seals, are sampling in high latitude regions where there are very few other in-situ observations.

 

The impact of mammal observations on ocean model temperature and salinity fields are assessed using hindcast experiments on the Met Office’s Global FOAM v12 system. This version of Global FOAM uses the NEMO ORCA025L75 ocean model coupled to the CICE sea-ice model. Data assimilation is performed using the NEMOVAR 3D-Var system with profile observations from the EN3 dataset as well as altimeter, SST and sea-ice data.

 

Varying amounts of mammal data were assimilated across three experiments: all seal temperature and salinity profiles, temperature profiles only, and no seal data. Results from all runs will be presented, with examples drawn from interesting regions such as fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and under sea-ice. It is concluded that mammal salinity data has a negative impact on model fields, as it is biased high. For Met Office operational ocean forecasting, it is suggested that only the mammal temperature profiles should be assimilated until salinity bias can be corrected in near-real time.

 

Matthew Martin

The Forecast Ocean Assimilation Model (FOAM) is an ocean analysis and forecast system that is run operationally at the Met Office.  The system is run every day, producing analyses and 7 day forecasts of physical ocean and sea-ice parameters such as temperature, salinity, currents and sea-ice concentration.  Satellite and in-situ observations are assimilated into FOAM during the analysis stage of each run.  The FOAM system includes both deep ocean and shelf sea configurations.  The deep ocean configurations are currently a global model with a 1/4 degree resolution, plus three 1/12 degree resolution regional models of the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean.  The shelf sea configurations of FOAM include tidal models of the Atlantic Margin (which includes a biogeochemical model) and the Persian Gulf.  FOAM is used to provide products to the Royal Navy as well as for the European MyOcean project and other customers. FOAM also provides the initial ocean and sea-ice conditions for coupled seasonal forecasts. An overview of the current system will be presented, together with results from recent developments and plans for future development.

host: Dr Lars Boehme

refID: 1221

hide details



20 Nov 2013
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Hierarchical Bayesian computing of 3-dimensional whale trajectories from tag and acoustic data
Christophe Laplanche
EcoLab > - Laboratoire d'écologie fonctionnelle

click for details

 

Researchers mainly use tagging and passive acoustics to study the underwater behavior of toothed whales in the field. Both approaches have divergences which mainly originate from dogmatic (how much tagging/recording alters whale behavior?) and technical (equipments are different and so are the way they are operated and the information they provide) aspects. Are tagging and passive acoustics that different? Both approach share the common goal of computing 3-dimensional whale trajectories from noisy data collected on a network of sensors. We actually show that an identical approach - under the form of a hierachical Bayesian model (HBM) - can be used to compute 3-dimensional whale trajectories from tag (including depth meter, accelerometer, magnetometer, gyroscope, GPS) and/or passive acoustic data. This approach has the advantages of (1) efficiently extracting information from the data, (2) efficiently merging different sources of data, and (3) propagating measurement errors to whale trajectory estimates. We illustrate the capabilities of the approach with simulated and field data.

host: Dr Janine Illian

refID: 1167

hide details



14 Nov 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: Effects of different land-uses on soil organic pools in the Peruvian tropical forests. AND Influence of coastal upwelling on the biodiversity of sandy beaches in South Africa.
Viktoria Oliver AND Pamela Cramb
University of St Andrews

click for details

07 Nov 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: Fin whales and earthquakes: monitoring fin whales off the southern Portuguese coast using seismic instruments.
Danielle Harris
CREEM, University of St Andrews

click for details

This talk will cover my postdoc work, which focuses on animal abundance estimation using acoustic data.  In particular, this case study uses distance sampling and spatiotemporal modelling to investigate the patterns of whale calling activity across the study area.  The fin whale data are also being used to develop new abundance estimation methods that account for the effects of
animal depth and movement.

host: Dr Dave Ferrier

refID: 1220

hide details



31 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: A validated, step-wise approach to drift dive classification using high resolution accelerometry data. AND Cetaceans in the Red Sea
Joseph Onoufriou AND Marina Costa
University of St Andrews

click for details

29 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
Bute
LTD

CBD Seminar: Seals, cetaceans and birds: thieves, or precious predators?
Dr Sophie Smout
University of St Andrews

click for details

I will be talking about apex predators and their interactions with the marine systems they inhabit.
 
For the first part of the talk I’ll focus on modelling prey intake with the aim of predicting diet composition and net intake rate to the availability of prey resources. This provides a crucial link between predator and prey populations, enabling us (for example) to predict how much fish will be removed by predators as prey abundance changes. I’ll talk about Bayesian methods, spatial overlap between predators and prey, and the outcomes of fitting MSFRs to field data for two North Sea predators (Grey seals Halichoerus grypus1 and Common guillemots Uria aalge2). The results have two nice applications (i) to suggest bottom-up impacts on predators as prey abundance changes (ii) to enable the use of apex predators as indicators of the abundance of prey.
 
MSFRs for apex predators can be integrated with multi-species population dynamics3, and this links to some ongoing work involving the integration of apex predators into the management of fisheries for ‘optimum yield’. To do this effectively we need to move somewhere beyond the traditional single species MSY approaches, e.g. considering spatial effects and multi-species trophic interactions. Within this framework, how can we take account of the impacts of fishing on the environment and humans?
 
A web link that may be useful is     http://www.myfishproject.eu/
 
And here are a couple of papers
 
Sophie Smout, Anna Rindorf, Philip S. Hammond, John Harwood, and Jason Matthiopoulos 2013 Modelling prey consumption and switching by UK grey seals ICES J. Mar. Sci. published online doi:10.1093/icesjms/fst109
 
2.      Smout, S., A. Rindorf, S. Wanless, F. Daunt, M. P. Harris, and J. Matthiopoulos. 2013. Seabirds maintain offspring provisioning rate despite fluctuations in prey abundance: a multi-species functional response for guillemots in the North Sea. Journal of Applied Ecology 50:1071-1079.
 
3.      Lindstrom, U., S. Smout, D. Howell, and B. Bogstad. 2009. Modelling multi-species interactions in the Barents Sea ecosystem with special emphasis on minke whales and their interactions with cod, herring and capelin. Deep-Sea Research Part ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography 56:2068-2079

http://biology.st-andrews.ac.uk/contact/staffProfile.aspx?sunid=scs10

host: Dr David Shuker

refID: 1160

hide details



24 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: Cell proliferation dynamics in regeneration of the operculum head appendage in the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii. AND An Endocrine Indicator of Maternal Success in Phocid Seals.
Réka Szabó AND Kelly Robinson
University of St Andrews

click for details

17 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminars: Spatial and temporal exposure of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) to toxins from harmful algae in Scotland. AND, Thermal experience causes life history changes in an invasive fish.
Silje-Kristin Jensen AND Al Reeve
University of St Andrews

click for details

10 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SOI seminar: The grass is always a different shade of green on the other side of the fence.
Dr Mick Wu
University of St Andrews

click for details

Research often requires a narrow focus to deepen our understanding of a particular field or to answer a specific question but crossing the fence to other fields can be very beneficial. This will be illustrated using my previous research experience. This informal seminar will be followed by a brainstorming session with the goal of bringing new insights to your own research.

host: Dr Dave Ferrier

refID: 1182

hide details



03 Oct 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Winter migrations, foraging strategy development and the importance of ephemeral features to a range pinnipeds
Mary-Anne Lea
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (University of Tasmania)

click for details

host:

refID: 1175

hide details



04 Sep 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Surveys and Population Monitoring of Alaska's Harbor Seals and Bering Okhotsk Seal Surveys (BOSS): Joint US-Russian Aerial Surveys for Ice-associated Seals, 2012 – 2013
Peter Boveng and Josh London
National Marine Mammal Laboratory in Seattle

click for details

host:

refID: 1148

hide details



03 Sep 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Anticipated responses of seals to warming in the Arctic and Winter site fidelity and movements of bearded seals in the Bering Sea
Peter Boveng
National Marine Mammal Laboratory in Seattle

click for details

host:

refID: 1147

hide details



29 Aug 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The Namibian Dolphin Project - Conservation Ecology of Cetaceans in Southern Africa
Simon Elwen
Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, South Africa

click for details

host:

refID: 1145

hide details



25 Jul 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Assessing the impact of climate change on seabird migration
James Grecian
NERC; University of Glasgow

click for details

In this talk, James will discuss his current research combining the analysis of museum specimens with field research to study the winter distribution of a genus of seabirds called prions. These birds range widely across the southern ocean and feed almost exclusively on large copepods. However, it is unclear how their migratory behaviour may be altered as copepod distributions shift in response to ocean warming.

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1143

hide details



18 Jul 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

“Dynamics, functional ecology and management of coastal ecosystems and associated benthos, with emphasis on mangroves” and “Marine Parasitology”
Dr. Karen Diele and Dr. Sonja Rueckert
SOI

click for details

Shared Seminar

host:

refID: 1141

hide details



30 May 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Eyes in the Sky
Paddy Pomeroy
SMRU

click for details

A quick overview of recent UAV development.

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1137

hide details



09 May 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

BRAHSS: a large behavioural response study on humpback whales on seismic survey air guns
Dr Mike Noad

click for details

There is currently a great deal of concern about how anthropogenic noise may impact upon marine mammals. In Australia, we are currently conducting a large behavioural response study to examine how the noise from oil and gas seismic surveys affects the behaviour of migrating humpback whales. In a series of four experiments over five years, we are testing a range of sources from a 20 cubic inch (cui) air gun to a full commercial array (3000+ cui). As well as detecting behavioural responses to the air gun signals, we are also attempting to tease out which factors might drive the response in terms of various predictor variables. Responses so far have been more muted than expected with the challenge now being picking up responses to the air guns against the 'noise' of behavioural variability caused by social interactions.”

host: Mr William Paterson

refID: 1131

hide details



26 Apr 2013
5:15 PM
Other
Parliament Hall

A celebration of the Firth of Forth: An Environmental History
Professor TC Smout (St Andrews) and Mairi Stewart (University of Highlands and Islands)

click for details

This event requires that you pre-register.

Professor Jan Bebbington and Dr John Clark invite you to 'A celebration of the Firth of Forth: An environmental History', a book recently co-authored by Professor Smout (St Andrews) and Mairi Stewart (University of Highlands and Islands). Firth of Forth: An Environmental History is a captivating exploration into the life of the Firth of Forth which considers a wide range of questions. The Firth of Forth combines a rich wildlife with a history of long and intense human activity around its shores and in its waters.

Talks will be given by the authors and guest speakers, who will draw from the book and their own interests of the Firth of Forth. After the talks there will be a space for questions and discussion, followed by a wine reception and finger buffet.

Please RSVP to Rhona McLaren (rmm9@st-andrews.ac.uk) by Wednesday 24th April, so that they have an idea of numbers. Free event, all welcome.

 

host: rmm9

refID: 1119

hide details



25 Apr 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Cultural evolution of killer whale dialects
Olga Filatova

click for details

Killer whales have group-specific vocal dialects, which pass from mother to offspring by social learning rather than genetically. Therefore, they represent one of the few examples of culturally transmitted signaling system, along with human languages, bird and humpback whale songs. It was proposed that killer whale dialects change in time due to the accumulation of random errors, but recent findings suggest that the process can be more complex.

host: Mr William Paterson

refID: 1120

hide details



03 Apr 2013
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Modelling the potential Population Consequences of Disturbance (PCoD) to marine mammals associated with UK offshore renewable energy developments
Prof J.Harwood
Creem

click for details

The UK is planning an enormous expansion of its offshore renewable energy capacity over the next 10-15 years that is likely to require an investment of more than £100 billion.  The construction and, to a lesser extent, the operation of these facilities could disturb thousands of marine mammals over periods of months and years.  It is, however, a legal offence to cause disturbance that will “impair the ability of animals to survive, breed, reproduce, or rear young” or which “significantly affects local distribution or abundance”.  The government can only issue developers with a licence to disturb if the disturbance does not affect the favourable conservation status of the species concerned.  However, quantitative assessments of the population-level effects of disturbance are currently lacking. We will describe our work on the interim PCoD project, which has been funded by the government departments that must decide whether or not to grant consent for these developments to go ahead. Its modelling framework provides assessments of the effects of disturbance at the population level, using the limited empirical data that are currently available, together with estimates of the levels of uncertainty associated with these predictions. The offshore renewable energy industry is now considering whether or not to fund a multi-million pound research programme that will fill in the gaps in our knowledge and reduce these uncertainties. 

host: Dr Janine Illian

refID: 1100

hide details



28 Mar 2013
1:00 PM
BMS
Lecture Theatre

PAMGUARD and passive acoustic research.
Jamie MacAulay et al

click for details

Over the last two years PAMGUARD has undergone some substantial changes making it a more friendly tool for acoustic data collection and analysis. We present some of the new changes which may be applicable to groups in SMRU along with results from some recent projects which are using PAMGUARD as the primary software for analysis. These include towed array surveys, long term static data collection and fine scale porpoise diving behaviour in tidal areas. At the end of the presentation we hope to open the floor for a discussion on new features and feedback on current use. 

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1092

hide details



27 Mar 2013
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Using effort, sightings, and body condition data to estimate survival and health of individuals and the entire right whale population.
Rob Schick
CREEM

click for details

Natural and anthropogenic stressors are presumed to impact the health and survival of right whales, yet the effect of these stressors has proven difficult to quantify. To address this issue we built a Hierarchical Bayesian model for survival of individual right whales and fit this model to 30 years worth of sighting data. We assimilate the photographic evidence of visual health parameters for individuals as observations of true, but hidden, health. We use the model to make inference on movement, individual survival, and individual health. In this talk I will present and discuss estimates of health of individuals, population sub-categories, and the entire population.

Estimates of individual health fluctuated across broad ranges, with a mean "healthy" score equaling 84 (on a 0 to 100) scale. We were able to quantitatively link discrete health observations to underlying continuous states, though estimates are less certain for animals with sparse sighting histories. For individuals, discrete observations of poor skin and body condition in particular, appeared to have a strong impact on health. We explored the health trajectories of different population classes, which suggest that females who bring their calves to known habitat regions (i.e. the Bay of Fundy, Canada) fared worse in the 1990's. Since that time, however, this population class appears in better health than females who do not bring their calves to the Bay of Fundy. At the population level, health was stable throughout much of the 1980's. Health values in the 1990's decline from a population average of 85 to a low of 72 in 1999. Population health stabilizes and increases in the 2000's, though the decade scale average (76) is lower than the 1980's.

In the future we hope to use these estimates of movement, survival and health to suggest possible management scenarios that increase survival among individuals and the population as a whole.

host: Dr Janine Illian

refID: 1097

hide details



21 Mar 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Sperm Whale Societies of the Atlantic and Pacific: Why so Different?
Hal Whitehead
Dalhousie University, Halifax

click for details

05 Mar 2013
10:00 AM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Marine Viruses: A Reservoir of Life
Dr Willie Wilson
Director, National Center for Marine Algae and Microbiota (NCMA)

click for details

Every day, every moment, an epic battle is raging across the globe. It's happening in the ocean. The evidence is both highly visible and totally hidden, depending on your perspective. In this seminar, Willie will discuss the tale of an arms race involving trillions of sea creatures and why their struggle is vital to life on this planet. A group of phytoplankton, known as coccolithophores, is engaged in a surprisingly complicated arms race with deadly giant viruses. A virus is problematic enough when you're a human.  Now imagine being a single-cell plant and mixing it up with the hugest virus you've ever seen. The coccolithophores are outgunned, but they won't go down without a serious fight. The seminar will start with a RadioLab interview (previously aired on National Public Radio) by reporter Ari Daniel Shapiro who visited Willie at Bigelow to explain how our itsy-bitsy heroes take arms against (literally) a sea of troubles. Their discussion explores how this battle, and others like it, makes life on Earth possible. Willie will continue the dialogue using examples of his research on the coccolithoviruses and other giant viruses, focusing on their role as a massive unexplored gene pool, a reservoir of ‘life’. He will also briefly touch on his role as director of the NCMA, the largest collection of marine phytoplankton in the world.
 
The RadioLab interview can be heard at: http://www.radiolab.org/blogs/radiolab-blog/2012/mar/05/war-we-need/

https://ncma.bigelow.org/

host: Prof Ian Johnston

refID: 1094

hide details



28 Feb 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The effects of non-lethal disturbance on the vital rates of a capital breeder
Fredrik Christiansen
University of Aberdeen

click for details

Human disturbances of wildlife, such as tourism, can alter the activities of targeted individuals. Repeated behavioural disruptions can have long-term consequences on individual’s vital rates. To manage these sub-lethal impacts, we need to understand how short-term behavioural changes can be linked to individual’s vital rates. We compared minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata behaviour on a feeding ground in the presence and absence of whalewatching boats in Iceland, using individual focal follows. Activity states were inferred from movement metric data, using mixture models, and transitions between states were estimated using Markov chains. Activity budgets were then estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Spatially explicit capture-recapture models were used to estimate the seasonal exposure of individual whales to whalewatching boats, so that the seasonal effect of whalewatching activities on the activity budget of minke whales could be estimated. This in turn was linked to body condition (blubber volume) using published bioenergetic data. Finally, changes in the body condition of pregnant females were linked to foetal growth, and hence reproduction. Although our estimates come with considerable uncertainty, this is the first study to link short-term behavioural effects of whalewatching boats to long-term effects on individual vital rates in a mysticete species.

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1087

hide details



10 Jan 2013
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The Galapagos: Sea lions and penguins on the equator
William Paterson

click for details

host:

refID: 1061

hide details



13 Dec 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Foraging strategies in southern elephant seals from the Western Antarctic Peninsula
Dr. Susan Gallon
Centre of Biodiversity and Biotechnology, Heriot-Watt University

click for details

 

Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) range widely throughout the Southern Ocean and are associated with important habitats (e.g., ice edges, shelf) where they accumulate energy (prey) to fuel their reproductive efforts on land. Knowledge of their fine scale foraging behaviour and individual foraging strategies, however, are limited. In this talk I will briefly present the result of a recent study where accelerometers were used to identify foraging events. Then I will present results obtained from the analyses of stable isotope (SI) concentration on consecutive sections of whole whiskers for 119 southern elephant seals from Elephant Island (61°13’5 55°23’W). We also combined SI analyses and satellite telemetry data for 29 individuals to better depict individual foraging strategies.

 

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1056

hide details



06 Dec 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Estimation, validation, and application of measures of body density as a metric of body condition in cetaceans
Patrick Miller
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

Body density can provide a measure of lipid content within the body of divers due to lipid's influence on net buoyancy of the diver. Recent work has demonstrated that body density can be estimated during drift dives, as well as both prolonged and intermittent glides during ascent and descent.  The analysis approach can also provide estimates of diving lung volume as well as body density, which I will illustrate with new results for beaked whales.    An ongoing project in SMRU seeks to develop this method of measuring body condition focusing on beaked whales and the humpback whale.  We will discuss our project plans and progress-to-date to measure variations in body density as function of the life-cycle of these two species, and two different approaches to validate body density as a metric of fat store:   measurement of lipid content in blubber biopsy samples and body dimension measurements using high-resolution sonar.

host: Miss Lauren Biermann

refID: 1054

hide details



29 Nov 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

How top predators face to the complex marine environment: Influence of the mesoscale dynamics on distribution and behavior of foraging predators
Cedric Cotte
Locean - University of Pierre and Marie Curie / CEBC / MASTS

click for details

22 Nov 2012
4:00 PM
SOI
Lecture theatre

Adventures of an intrepid doctor working in the Antarctic
Gavin Francis

click for details

22 Nov 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Harp Seals from Canada and the Barents Sea: surveys, population models and condition/fecundity
Garry Stenson, Tor Arne and Sophie Smout

click for details

15 Nov 2012
1:00 PM
SOI

Project CONCEAL -- Chronic Ocean Noise: Cetacean Ecology and Acoustic habitat Loss
Rob Williams

click for details

host:

refID: 1042

hide details



30 Oct 2012
12:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Pressure, Gas and Diving Mammals: Some Clues to the Enigma
Dr Michael Moore
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Biology

click for details

Michael Moore (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Andreas Fahlman (Texas A&M University Corpus Christi), Sophie Dennison (San Francisco), USA

Marine mammal strandings can follow behavioral change, coastal topography, weather, individual disease, entanglement, vessel strike, and differ by species and location. Today the general public are prone to presume that marine mammals are at risk from the bends, and therefore all strandings are caused by sonar exercises. Not so! Submerged divers at depth contain gas in the naso-laryngo-pulmonary system at a higher pressure than surface, owing to the pressure of the surrounding water (SCUBA and Breath-hold). Decompression sickness (DCS) risk increases if diving for extended periods or at greater depth, without ascending in a manner to slowly reduce the excess pressure of inert gases dissolved in the body. DCS has been confirmed in rare cases of human breath holding divers who have made a sequence of many deep dives with short surface intervals. Bubble presence does not necessarily imply DCS risk. This talk will examine if diving mammals are immune to DCS or do they usually avoid it? Data (mostly published) will be presented on post mortem bubbles in bycatch, chronic joint lesions in sperm whales, hyperbaric CT, lung inflation/ deflation curves, alveolar collapse, ultrasound and microparticles.

http://www.whoi.edu/profile.do?id=mmoore

host: Prof Peter Tyack

refID: 1031

hide details



25 Oct 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

To see or not to see: Ganges River Dolphin detectability
Nadia Richman
Zoological Society of London

click for details

Detecting trends in population size is reliant on accurate and precise monitoring methods. This study investigates the accuracy of Ganges River Dolphin abundance estimates obtained during visual boat-based surveys in the southern rivers of Bangladesh. Using a simultaneous acoustic survey, it has been possible to investigate the factors that affect detection of dolphins during visual surveys and make recommendations to improve accuracy during future surveys.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 999

hide details



18 Oct 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Monitoring marine mammal populations using acoustics: opportunities and challenges
Dr Danielle Harris
SMRU, CREEM

click for details

Marine mammal abundance is traditionally estimated using data collected from visual surveys.  However, acoustic data can also be used to produce abundance estimates, and offers a number of advantages over visual survey methods.  One advantage is that there are many instruments already deployed worldwide for a variety of purposes, including military and seismic monitoring, that can also be used for marine mammal monitoring.  However, surveying marine mammals using only their vocalisations creates several research challenges.  In this seminar, I will give an overview of how acoustic data can be used to estimate marine mammal abundance, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of acoustic monitoring.  I will use examples from case studies involving blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in the Indian Ocean and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) in the Atlantic Ocean.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 1020

hide details



11 Oct 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Update on the declines in UK harbour seals
Dr Mike Lonergan
SMRU

click for details

In 2006 SMRU noticed a substantial decline in the numbers of harbour seals seen during the aerial surveys of the Orkneys. In 2007 we published an analysis that showed similar problems in all the populations in eastern Scotland. It now looks possible that the decline in the Moray Firth may be slowing, but also likely that harbour seals will soon be locally extinct in the Firth of Tay and Eden Estuary SAC. This talk presents recent data from the aerial surveys and raises, but does not answer, the difficulty of reconciling the observed patterns with various causes that have been suggested.

I intend to keep the presentation short enough to allow time for general discussion about the problem and its implications.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 1027

hide details



04 Oct 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Getting there is half the fun: an analysis of humpback whale navigation techniques
Ann Allen
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

click for details

06 Sep 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Conservation Ecology of the Indus River dolphin in Pakistan
Dr Gill Braulik

click for details

17 Jul 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Acoustic monitoring of Alaskan Cook Inlet Beluga whales
Dr Manuel Castellote
National Marine Mammal Lab, NOAA

click for details

Acoustic studies with captive beluga whales in Spain promoted the use of passive acoustic monitoring methods on beluga whale populations in Alaska. In 2009, National Marine Fisheries Service and Alaska Department of Fish and Game joined efforts to develop a research project to monitor the presence of the endangered Cook Inlet beluga whale population with acoustic moorings. This seminar will present the background, challenges and progress of such a problematic project in an area covered by dense ice for half of the year, with tides exceeding 10 meters, currents over 9 knots and extreme glacial sediment dynamics.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 970

hide details



09 Jul 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Oceanographic factors influencing aggregations and movements of pygmy blue whales in the Perth Canyon, Western Australia.
Olga Bondarenko
University of Western Australia

click for details

The Perth Canyon, off the coast of Western Australia, is one of the known areas in the world where pygmy blue whales aggregate during the summer months. This canyon is the largest (100 km long) and deepest (4000 meters) submarine canyon in Australia. The canyon is visited annually by pygmy blue whales with the highest presence during late austral summer into early autumn. A passive acoustic observatory comprising a triangular array of four autonomous sea noise recorders was deployed on the canyon slope about 400 meters deep in 2009 as part of a multiyear program of passive acoustic observations of the Integrated Marine Observing System. Through an analysis of sea noise data recorded by the receivers of this observatory over the period of 7 months (December 2009 to July 2010) we identified pygmy blue whale calls and assessed the relative number of singing animals present within the range of acoustic detection.
Moreover, we located and traced the movement of singing whales using signals received at four loggers by the use of triangulation. We found that the highest numbers of singing whales were recorded in April. During December and January there was a definite trend in their movement in a southward direction whereas in February and March the majority of whales travelled to the north matching the migratory patterns. These acoustic observations will assist in answering
important questions regarding ecology, migration and population estimates of pygmy blue whales. The next step in my PhD is to use the complete dataset from 2009 till 2012 to estimate the temporal pattern in relative abundance of pygmy blue whales in the Perth Canyon and link this with oceanographic factors.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 984

hide details



18 Jun 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD): Commonness, rarity and biodiversity in the Marine Biosphere
Prof Sean Connolly
ARC Australian Professorial Fellow James Cook University

click for details

Most attempts to understand patterns of commonness and rarity in high-diversity systems make assumptions about the broad-scale distribution of species traits, and seek to predict aggregate properties of communities such as the species-abundance distribution or species-area relationships, rather than seeking to calibrate classical ecological models such as Lotka-Volterra equations. The most ambitious of these approaches is neutral theory, according to which species are demographically identical, regardless of species, and chance variation in births, deaths, and speciation events overwhelmingly drives patterns in community structure. Unambiguous tests of this core hypothesis are hard to construct, however, and, despite numerous attempts, modifications to ancillary assumptions of neutral models are invariably invoked to explain apparent discrepancies between data and neutral theory. In this talk, Prof Connolly will identify features of species-abundance distributions likely to be shared by all models making the species-equivalence assumption. He shows that commonness and rarity in reef coral and fish assemblages deviate in a systematic way from these predictions. He then confirms the likely generality of these discrepancies, at least for benthic marine macro-organisms, with a global analysis of over one thousand species abundance distributions spanning tropical, temperate, and polar regions, and from shallow water platforms to abyssal depths.

All welcome!

host:

refID: 977

hide details



01 Jun 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Climate geoengineering and ocean acidification: what's the link?
Dr Phil Williamson
School of Environmental Science, University of East Anglia

click for details

Dr Williamson is currently the UEA-based Science Coordinator for several programmes funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council:

UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme (http://www.nerc.ac.uk/research/programmes/oceanacidification/)
UK Surface Ocean – Lower Atmosphere Study (UK SOLAS www.nerc.ac.uk/research/programmes/solas )
Oceans 2025, the strategic research programme involving seven NERC-funded marine centres ( www.oceans2025.org ).

Dr Williamson has also  been the coordinator or manager for six other NERC multi-laboratory programmes, including those on marine biogeochemistry (Biogeochemical Ocean Flux Study, BOFS; the main UK contribution to JGOFS); marine biofouling; marine and freshwater microbial biodiversity; and marine productivity (UK GLOBEC)..

After a Natural Sciences (zoology) degree at Cambridge, Dr Williamson did a mix of terrestrial and marine research at Durham, Portsmouth, Naples and Robin Hoods’ Bay. However, he quickly became involved in science management  including research administration, programme planning, and knowledge transfer at NERC Swindon Office,  Plymouth Marine Laboratory, and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Stockholm, as Deputy Executive Director. In addition to reports, PR material, grey literature, and a research papers, he has also produced a DVD “Out of the Blue”, on the ecological, evolutionary and economic importance of marine microbes.

http://researchpages.net/people/phil-williamson/

host:

refID: 966

hide details



31 May 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SMRU Seminar: TBA
Simon Moss
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

12 Apr 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Do seals use noise as information? Plans for studying noise perception
Dr Vincent Janik
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

05 Apr 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

IWC Pollution 2000+ - Assessing the risks of contaminant exposure to cetacean populations
Dr Ailsa Hall
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

29 Mar 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

To copy or not to copy? Why do bottlenose dolphins copy each other's signature whistles?
Dr Stephanie King
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

28 Mar 2012
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Fat floats!  Developing widely-applicable methods to measure the body condition of diving marine mammals   
 Patrick Miller
SMRU

click for details

Many diving mammals undergo substantial changes in their body density and mass, body condition parameters which have been shown to affect vital rates in some species of seals.   Nutritive body condition reflects a complex integration of foraging effort (energy expenditure), foraging success (energy acquisition), and within-body allocation to lipid stores and/or growth (or replacement) of non-lipid body stores. At-sea measurement of body density has been demonstrated with drift-dives of elephant seals and has enabled identification of locations and times in which foragers build fat stores.  The drift dive method, however, does not track changes in body mass and is not applicable to species that do not perform drift dives.  In this seminar, I will demonstrate that drift dives are just one type of ‘gliding’ behaviour, and that the speed of animals during glides can be described analytically with a mathematical model which includes the influences of drag and buoyancy forces on the gliding diver.  Using this model, we have been able to consistently estimate the body density of elephant seals using different types of glides that are routinely performed by most marine divers.   I will present efforts to apply this approach to measure the body density of deep and shallow diving cetaceans, and discuss challenges related to the influence of diving lung volume on shallow divers.

host: Dr Janine Illian

refID: 949

hide details



26 Mar 2012
2:00 PM
BMS
BMS lecture theatre

Science Media Seminar: Scientific Publishing from the Inside Out
Sacha Vignieri, PhD
Associate Editor SCIENCE

click for details

Abstract
From the outside, publication in high-impact general-science journals can seem like a mysterious process. A general understanding of the procedures and practices at Science can help unravel the mystery a bit, and contribute to an understanding of what makes a good (or even great) paper a high-impact-journal paper. In particular, while many researchers strive to publish in these journals because of their high impacts, they are fundamentally general-science journals, and understanding this can help authors assess which aspects of their own work will be most successful in such outlets. I’ll discuss some of the inner workings of Science and provide insight for helping authors prepare and assess their own work for consideration in high-impact general-science publications.

Biography
Dr. Vignieri received her bachelor's degree from the UC Berkeley, where she majored in integrative biology and conducted undergraduate research in animal behavior and behavioral endocrinology. She received her PhD in zoology (with a focus on ecology, evolution, and behavior) from the University of Washington in 2005, where she studied the population genetics and dispersal ecology of the Pacific jumping mouse, under the guidance of Dr. Jim Kenagy. After graduation, she received a Leverhulme Visiting Scholarship to study evolutionary theory with Drs. Joel Peck and David Waxman at the University of Sussex. In 2006 she was awarded a University of California Presidential post-doctoral fellowship to study ecological adaptation in beach mice at the UC San Diego with Dr. Hopi Hoekstra. She completed this research as a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University in 2010. That year, she also joined the editorial staff at Science as an associate editor covering the fields of organismal biology, ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation.

host: Prof Ian Boyd

refID: 938

hide details



22 Mar 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Bycatch of small cetaceans in gillnets
Dr Alice Mackay
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

Bycatch of cetaceans in fishing gear is considered to be one of the biggest conservation threats to these species. The majority of global cetacean bycatch is believed to occur in gillnets, which are particularly widely used in small-scale artisanal fisheries. Although cetacean bycatch in gillnets can be reduced through the use of acoustic alarms or time area closures, both the implementation and enforcement of such management approaches is expensive.  In contrast, modifications to fishing gear can provide a relatively low cost method of reducing the incidental capture of non-target species. This talk summarises results from a number of studies, including an investigation of relationships between gear characteristics and small cetacean bycatch in UK gillnet fisheries and a comparison of harbour porpoise echolocation behaviour around gillnets with different gear characteristics. In addition results of an experimental trial to investigate the potential of "stiff" and "reflective" gillnets at reducing small cetacean bycatch are presented.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 906

hide details



15 Mar 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

European Cetacean Society conference practice talks
Charlotte Dunn and Lucia Martin Lopez
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

Charlotte Dunn - Killer whale occurence and predation in the Bahamas

Lucia Martin Lopez - Gait changes in deep-diving Blainvilles beaked whales: Stroke B: A novel finding

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 907

hide details



13 Mar 2012
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Foraging success of southern elephant seals in relation to the oceanographic context.
Dr Christophe Guinet
CEBC-CNRS, France

click for details

The fine scale foraging behaviour of southern elephant seals was investigated by using a combination of loggers (accelerometer, magnetometers, and time depth recorders) alowing the 3 dimension reconstruction of the dive simultaneously with the recording of a number of oceanographic parameters (temperatures, salinity, fluorescence, dissoleved oxygen and light) and Argos /GPS tracking devices. This biologging approach was completed by the use of stable isotopes to identify the  foraging habitat along a latitudinal gradient (C13) and the trophic levels (N15).  In this presentation I will present you the most recent results obtained at CEBC-CNRS relating the changes in foraging success with the foraging habitat  and oceanographic conditions at sales ranging from the foraging trip to the dive and the output of 10 years of fruitfull collaboration with SMRU reserchers and engienners in developping new satelitte data relayed oceanographic loggers.

host: Prof Michael Fedak

refID: 928

hide details



08 Mar 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Do some cetacean species construct their calls from sequences of phoneme-like subunits?
Professor Peter Tyack
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

01 Mar 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Population structure of harbour seals in the UK
Dr Valentina Islas
Sea Mammal Research Unit

click for details

The population structure of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) around Scotland was investigated using a panel of nuclear microsatellites. Analysis of DNA samples from a total of 453 individuals around Scotland including samples from comparative regions in the UK and Europe (including an out-group of Pacific harbour seals) was carried out. This allowed discrete population units or metapopulations to be identified and compared with recently defined management regions.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 912

hide details



16 Feb 2012
4:00 PM
MBS
Seminar room 2

Exploring illness communications: unpicking the impact of social structure on communicating health and illness
Dr Barry Gibson
Unit of Dental Public Health, School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield

click for details

16 Feb 2012
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Alternative mating tactics in Alpine chamois
Luca Corlatti
Siena University

click for details

Alpine chamois are commonly seen as a highly polygymous species. However, its limited sexual-size dimorphism and the unbiased sex-specific survival curves suggest a more conservative reproductive strategy by males. To date, two mating tactics have been recognized: territorial and non-territorial males.

My PhD aims to characterize such alternative tactics from the behavioural viewpoint, by investigating: 

- the qualitative and quantitative ethogram of the 2 male types during the rutting season;
- the differential allocation of time to various activities, with special reference to foraging strategies before, during and after the rut;
- the differential pattern of aggressive behaviour in relation to hormone metabolites. 

The aim of this work lies in the investigation of potential costs and benefits associated to the adoption of one of the alternative mating tactics.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 892

hide details



23 Jan 2012
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Effects of global environmental change on fish, fisheries and marine ecosystems.
Dr Steve Simpson
University of Bristol

click for details

15 Dec 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Minke whales’ responses to a highly dynamic environment
Ursula Tscherter
SMRU/SOI

click for details

Probably the best place in the world to study these elusive whales is the St. Lawrence Estuary in Eastern Canada. High numbers and re-sighting rates based on a long-term photo-identification program allow unique in-depth studies of their habitat use, site-fidelity, breathing and feeding ecology and the relation thereof to underlying environmental factors. Ursula will share her knowledge gained in more than 15 years of field studies.

host: Miss Heather Anderson

refID: 866

hide details



08 Dec 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

An update on Marine Policy Frameworks
Timothy Stojanovic
Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews

click for details

11 Nov 2011
10:00 AM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

Postgraduate Conference - Day 2

click for details

All academic staff and PhD students are welcome to attend this two-day event at which PhD students will present posters and give talks.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 845

hide details



10 Nov 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

How to find funding using Research Professional
David Stevenson
University of St Andrews

click for details

The University of St Andrews maintains a subscription to Research Professional.  This thoughtfully and comprehensively maintained database is a powerful search engine for funding.  Once mastered, a wealth of new funding opportunities (>6000) will be at your fingertips.  It is truly is a one-stop-shop for funding opportunities.

Topics of the seminar include
*       Full text keyword searching
*       Boolean searching
*       Saving your searches
*       Excluding search results whose closing dates are too near
*       Narrowing the search by discipline
*       Narrowing the search by award type
*       Searching for early career opportunities
*       Exporting searches for easy reading
*       How to make those research fortnightly e-mails clogging your inbox more useful
Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops if possible, but this is not required.
http://www.researchprofessional.com/

Best wishes,
David Stevenson
Business Development Manager
University of St Andrews
Research Business Development & Contracts
The Gateway, North Haugh, St Andrews
KY16 9RJ, Scotland, United Kingdom,
+44 (0) 1334 46 2224 (0h GMT)

http://www.researchprofessional.com

host:

refID: 843

hide details



10 Nov 2011
9:30 AM
MBS
Lecture Theatre

Postgraduate Conference - Day 1

click for details

All academic staff and PhD students are welcome to attend this two-day event at which PhD students will present posters and give talks.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 844

hide details



27 Oct 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

PAMBuoy. What it is, what it does and what we can do with the data.
Doug Gillespie
SMRU/SOI

click for details

Most people at SMRU are aware of the yellow buoy we deployed in St Andrews Bay back in June. The buoy is running continuous passive acoustic  detectors for dolphin whistles (and imminently also porpoises). The purpose of this seminar is to update people on what PAMBuoy is, what it is capable of and to show examples of the types of data which can be collected. There will then be an open discussion of the types of analysis which might be conducted with PAMBuoy data in the near to medium term, possibly with a view to developing some student projects (MSc or PhD) using PAMBuoy data in 2012. 

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 813

hide details



20 Oct 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Linking regional physics and chlorophyll-a to the foraging patterns of Southern Elephant Seals from Marion Island
Lauren Biermann
Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town

click for details

07 Jul 2011
1:00 PM
The Observatory
Lecture Theatre

"Liquid Trust" - Oxytocin's effects on aggression and affiliation
Kelly Robinson
SMRU/SOI

click for details

30 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Corkscrew seal deaths
David Thompson
SMRU/SOI

click for details

host:

refID: 770

hide details



23 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Seals like it hot: changes in surface temperature of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from late pregnancy to moult
William Patterson
SMRU/SOI

click for details

The annual moult in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) follows a few weeks after the end of lactation and is characterised by a progressive loss and regrowth of hair which is apparent over a 4-6 week period. It is thought that during the moult harbour seals increase the time spent ashore as an adaptation to avoid additional energy costs associated with blood flow to the skin surface. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which harbour seals regulated their surface temperature in order to maximise hair regrowth during the moult. The surface temperature of two female harbour seals was recorded in captivity using infrared thermography from late pregnancy to completion of the moult. Study animals were more likely to haul out during lactation and during the moult. The temperature difference between body surface and air temperature (dT) over days postpartum showed a ~10 ºC elevation at the peak of the moult as compared to the premoult period. Also, during the moult dT reached a higher maximum at a faster rate over a two hour haulout period. Heat loss was estimated to increase during the moult and was equivalent to an approximate doubling of resting metabolic rate. It was therefore evident that harbour seals minimise the energetic cost of the moult by hauling out so that they can maintain an optimal skin surface temperature for hair growth.  Human disturbance at haul out sites during the moult may have consequences for harbour seals either by prolonging the moult if they are prevented from hauling out and hence maintaining optimal conditions for hair growth or by forcing animals into the water when their skin temperature is high.

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 752

hide details



16 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Biotoxin exposure in harbour seals and other marine mammals
Ailsa Hall
SMRU/SOI

click for details

15 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Linking Krill Variability in the Southern Ocean to Migrating Whale Energetics
Janelle Braithwaite
UWA Oceans Institute. University of Western Australia.

click for details

09 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

A Life Acoustic
Jamie McAulay
SMRU/SOI

click for details

The rapid expansion of marine renewable energy, especially tidal turbines, has introduced a need to be able to study the fine scale movements of marine mammals underwater. For species, such as harbour porpoises, which are impractical to tag and only produce narrow band high frequency clicks this is a particularly difficult task. Although passive acoustics are widely used to monitor porpoise populations fine scale tracking has rarely been attempted. Over the past few years we have been using two and three dimensional arrays along with novel mathematical techniques, borrowed from the astronomy department, to investigate the possibility of an entirely passive acoustic approach to determine fine scale movements. Our results include convincing dive profiles, accurately localised simulated clicks and early three dimensional data.

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 745

hide details



09 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Recent research, including Seal predation on Salmon farms
Alex Coram
SMRU/SOI

click for details

08 Jun 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

A Dynamic Stochastic Food web model of the Barents sea
Ulf Lindstrøm
Institute of Marine Research Tromsø

click for details

26 May 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The way to a male’s heart is through his stomach: Reproductive strategies in Weddell seals
Rob Harcourt
Macquarie University

click for details

In terrestrially breeding phocid seals males are significantly larger than females with large size conferring advantage in male-male competition, increasing their ability to fast during the breeding season, prolonging tenure and hence mating opportunities. For aquatically breeding seals, the opportunity to feed during the breeding season may offset the need for large size and the ability to fast. We measured individual differences in male breeding success, behaviour and mass changes for Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Turtle Rock, McMurdo Sound (77.727S, 166.85E). Paternity analysis was used in conjunction with measures of age, site fidelity and behaviour during the breeding season to assess variance in male breeding success. Paternity could be assigned to 177 pups at relaxed or 80% confidence level or 111 pups at strict or 95% confidence levels. Weddell seals at Turtle Rock show a modest degree of polygyny with the greatest number of pups sired by any individual male in a single season equalling 5, or ~10% of the pups born. Over four consecutive years most (89.2%) males sired at least one pup. In a GLM model, age, and the age first seen at the study site as an adult were unrelated to mating success but adult experience, either site-specific or elsewhere in McMurdo Sound over the reproductive lifespan of males explained nearly 40% of variance in total mating success with 80% confidence and 24% of variance at 95% confidence. Furthermore, males were tracked under the ice through each breeding season using an acoustic array (n=15). Mass changes were measured for 30 males all of which were successfully genotyped and were aged between 6 and 20 years (mean 13.7). Territory use was dynamic, with some males spending most of the time either at or near the surface, others diving deep and others switching from regular diving to near surface behaviour. Rate of mass loss varied more than three fold (mean 2.1 ± 0.53 kg / day, range 0.0 to 4.1) as did mass-specific loss (mean 0.53 ± 0.23). Maximum dive depth also varied dramatically (10 to 518 m) and was inversely related to the rate of mass-specific loss suggesting that the deep diving males may offset the costs of breeding by foraging. Foraging during the breeding season may be a male strategy to prolong tenure, but appears to be facultative rather than obligative .

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 750

hide details



19 May 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Use of visual sense in mid-water foraging by loggerhead turtles revealed by video and 3D data
Dr Tomoko Narazaki
International Coastal Research Center, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo

click for details

12 May 2011
1:30 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Interpolation techniques for telemetry data
Esther Lane
SMRU/SOI

click for details

11 Apr 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Frozen Secrets
Lars Boehme
SMRU/SOI

click for details


Ever stood on sea ice with 2000m of water below you? Every wondered how long you would survive in this freezing water? Ever wondered how to get data from these remote and harsh environments? Studying the ocean in Antarctica is extremely challenging! However, with the help of the local seal population we seem to get this problem solved. A project between the University of St Andrews and the British Antarctic Survey deploys miniaturised oceanographic instruments on Weddell seals in the southernmost parts of the world's oceans. Starting in 2007 with a pilot study involving only four seals to deploying 20 instruments in February 2011 this project has grown into a major component in observing the Antarctic waters. For the first time, substantial winter surveys of one of the most important regions for the production of source waters of the global ocean conveyor belt were obtained and new insights into the local variability were gained. Although the proposed research is funded on the basis for an oceanographic need, it also fills a need for information on the distribution and behaviour of these important deep ice predators. These animals play a pivotal role as top predators in the Southern Ocean ecosystem and, as such, are vulnerable to environmental change. This population of Weddell seals has received little study and the recent pilot study showed unexpected long-range movements and under ice diving behaviour.

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 729

hide details



03 Feb 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Vocal behaviour of Shetland killer whales: implications for dietary specialisation and population identity
Volker Deecke
SMRU/SOI

click for details

27 Jan 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

An individual-based study of harbour seals: Insights into the decline or an exception to the rule?
Line Cordes
Lighthouse Field Station, Aberdeen University

click for details

20 Jan 2011
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

TBA
Simon Northridge
SMRU/SOI

click for details

16 Dec 2010
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

St. Lawrence Blues. Long-term studies on baleen whales in the Gulf of St. Lawrence
Christian Ramp
Mingan Island Cetacean Study/SMRU

click for details

18 Oct 2010
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Tagging humpback whales and tracking krill in the fjords of the Western Antarctic Peninsula: An interdisciplinary and multi-scale study of humpback whales and Antarctic krill.
Prof Doug Nowacek
Duke University

click for details

20 Sep 2010
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Dirty deeds done down deep: What DTAGs on echolocating odontocetes reveal about deep-water predators and their prey.
Mark Johnson
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

click for details

26 Apr 2010
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Evaluating and mitigating the risk to marine mammals from human activities: lessons from fisheries and acoustic disturbance.
Prof John Harwood
University of St Andrews

click for details

12 Apr 2010
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Selection on quantitative traits in the wild.
Prof Josephine Pemberton
University of Edinburgh

click for details

01 Mar 2010
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Do androids dream of eclectic seals? - testing for pinniped personalities in wild populations.
Dr Sean Twiss
University of Durham

click for details

07 Dec 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Scaling of diving speed in free-ranging seabirds, marine mammals, and sea turtles
Dr Yuuki Watanabe
National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo

click for details

26 Oct 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Applications of heavy metal isotopes in the biological sciences
Prof Christopher Hawkesworth
University of St Andrews

click for details

The application of radiogenic and stable isotopes revolutionized ideas in the Earth Sciences, and it is opportune to consider further their application in the biological sciences. Broadly there are two applications. Some isotopes (for example, Sr, Nd, Pb & Hf) are the products of radioactive decay, and they are used to date geological samples. One consequence of the radioactive decay is at the present time different rocks and minerals have different ratios of such isotopes and these can be used to constrain contributions from different source materials and terrains. Other isotopes, termed stable isotopes, fractionate because the isotopes of different mass behave differently, the lighter one tends to be more reactive. Light isotopes (of O, C, N and S) fractionate readily at low temperatures, but there is now increasing interest in heavier stable isotopes, such as Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo, Hg, Se, Ni and Cr. Some are more readily fractionated under different redox conditions, and most are thought to be fractionated by biotic processes. They are therefore increasingly used to investigate the development of early life.

 

In general there are two broad areas of application of radiogenic and heavy stable isotopes in the biological sciences. The first is through in situ analyses of biological archives, for example, coral, teeth, fish scales and otoliths, to investigate changes in the conditions experienced by the animal. The temporal resolution depends on the rate of growth of the material being analysed, but laser ablation and ion probes typically analyse areas 40-10 microns across. The second area is in understanding the mechanisms and implications of heavy stable isotope fractionation by biological processes, not least as these may provide relatively robust proxies in the geological record. Case studies will be presented, and some of the wider implications will be explored.

host: Prof David Paterson

refID: 559

hide details



12 Oct 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Is Earth the only planet with photosynthesis?
Prof John Raven
University of Dundee

click for details

Abstract:

Astrobiology seeks (my definition) to set criteria for the occurrence of life other than on Earth, and to devise and employ methods for detecting any such life. I have chosen photosynthetically supported life because I know something about it, which may seem like looking for keys lost in a street at night under a street-lamp rather than where you think you lost them. However, in this case the street-lamp may be the right place, for two reasons. One is likeliehood: a diverse and productive biosphere must be energized by electromagnetic radiation; geochemical energy inputs to Earth-like planets are inadequate. The other is detectability: use of the commonest reductant in the habitat of life as we know it, i.e. water, generates oxygen in larger quantities than can be generated geochemically (Lovelock's test), and oxygen (as oxygen or ozone) and the equivalent of the reflectance "red edge" of chlorophyll on Earth can potentially be (very) remotely sensed by reflectance spectroscopy. In the lecture I shall attempt to justify these assertions, and also discuss recent work with colleagues on the potential for photosynthesis in (astronomically) reflected radiation, on planets in binary star systems, and for "cryptic photosynthesis" where products, but not pigments, could be remotely sensed.

host: Dr Dave Ferrier

refID: 558

hide details



16 Sep 2009
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Aerial surveys to establish baseline distribution and abundance of Hector’s dolphin - Cloudy and Clifford Bays, New Zealand.
Sam du Fresne
SMRU Ltd

click for details

Clifford Bay Marine Farms Ltd is seeking to establish a new marine farm – for green-lipped mussels - in Clifford Bay, on the east coast of New Zealand. During the consenting phase of this project, concerns were raised about potential impacts on a local population of the endangered Hector’s dolphins (Cephalorhynchus hectori hectori), residing in Clifford Bay and neighbouring Cloudy Bay. In order to establish baseline distribution and abundance (for subsequent post-installation monitoring), three years of aerial surveys were carried out, using distance sampling methods (MRDS). Four surveys per year were carried out per year, corresponding approximately with spring, summer, autumn and winter. This talk will describe the survey work, and discuss the results.

host: cgp2@st-and.ac.uk

refID: 543

hide details



11 Jun 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

TBA - Vaquita acoustic talk
Rene Swift
SMRU

click for details

29 May 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

It's not how old you are its who you know: male mating success in Weddell seals
Rob Harcourt
Macquarie University

click for details

14 May 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Biologging in the Global Ocean Observing System
Lars Boehme
SMRU

click for details

23 Apr 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

'Proteolysis inducing factor - Inflammation, Survival and Cancer'
Professor Jim Ross
University of Edinburgh

click for details

23 Apr 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Comparative foraging behaviour and energetic of Cape and Australian fur seals
John Arnould

click for details

20 Apr 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Humpback whale songs: progress towards determining the function of a complex and changing signal in a challenging environment
Dr. Michael Noad
University of Queensland

click for details

16 Apr 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The Marine Application of the Habitats Directive: Challenges and Opportunities
Richard Caddell
Swansea University, School of Law

click for details

Dr Richard Caddell, a lecturer at Swansea University, School of Law, will be giving a lecture to the MRes Marine Mammal Science students about legal frameworks relevant to marine mammal management/ conservation, followed by a SMRU seminar. The working title for his SMRU seminar is: "The Marine Application of the Habitats Directive: Challenges and Opportunities" where he intends to focus primarily on some of the issues raised by the legal protection of marine SACs/SCIs as well as reconciling development policies within and around these areas. Richard has suggested to also touch upon noise issues - especially in relation to oil and gas exploration - in the context of the Habitats Directive, and EU marine environmental policies generally. He is also currently finalising a paper on the legal regulation of AHDs/pingers, so will touch upon this too, especially in relation to emerging fisheries issues in SACs. All are welcome to attend the lecture (geared towards MRes MMS students) which will take place in the Gatty Lecture theatre on Thursday, 16 April, 0930-1100h, followed by the SMRU seminar at the usual time & place. Please contact Sonja (sh52) if you are interested in speaking to Richard outside the seminar/lecture settings.

host: tp14, sh52

refID: 479

hide details



15 Apr 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The decline of the Steller sea lion - Was it food?
Dom Tollit

click for details

07 Apr 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

North Atlantic right whales in Cape Cod Bay - monitoring a critically endangered species
Ruth Leeney

click for details

02 Apr 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Report from the ONR Cetacean Tag Design Workshop 2009
Vincent Janik
SMRU

click for details

26 Mar 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Each of the three speakers will spend 20min presenting some aspect of their research
Ricardo Antunes, Thomas Gotz, Lucia Di Iorio

click for details

25 Mar 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Use of active sonar for cetacean conservation and behavioural ecology studies: a paradox?
Matteo Bernasconi
Pelagic Ecology Research Group, Gatty Marine Lab

click for details

23 Mar 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre C

The early evolution of life on Earth
Professor Paul G. Falkowski
Institute of Marine and Coastal Studies; Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

click for details

talk is co-hosted by CEGG

Please note new venue

host: Prof Thomas Meagher

refID: 474

hide details



12 Mar 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The adaptation and use of radio frequency identification (rfid) tags for marking harbour seals (Phoca vitulina)
Ailsa Hall
SMRU

click for details

04 Mar 2009
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Passive acoustic monitoring and risk mitigation
Walter Zimmer
NATO Undersea Research Centre

click for details

02 Mar 2009
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

The coevolutionary relationship between bitterling fish and freshwater mussels
Dr. Carl Smith
Department of Biology, University of Leicester

click for details

27 Feb 2009
1:30 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

High frequency whistles produced by killer whales (Orcinus orca)
Filipa Samarra
SMRU

click for details

27 Feb 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Do Sperm Whales (Physeter macrocephalus) Use Vision When Foraging at Depth?
Eva Hartvig
SMRU

click for details

26 Feb 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Discussion Session: The SMRU/SMRU Ltd liaison group
TBA
SMRU Ltd

click for details

This session will present the current SMRU Ltd projects and explore new
opportunities for bids including RCUK funds to develop technology in the
all Sciences (http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/basictech/default.htm) and attached
document. We hope for a brain-storming session to identify possible new
directions in SMRU science that could lead to successful bids.

NOTE: Please find "attached document" in "\\Smru-temp\scratch\SMRU seminar"

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 467

hide details



18 Feb 2009
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

A long term research program on marine mammals in Western Australia: studies in acoustics, ecology, and behaviour
Dr. Chandra Salgado
Centre for Marine Science and Technology,Curtin University of Technology

click for details


The presentation will consist of an overview of some of the research this is done at CMST.



 

host:

refID: 453

hide details



09 Feb 2009
5:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre C

Mind the gap: did Darwin avoid publishing his theory for 20 years?
Dr John van Wyhe
The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online, University of Cambridge

click for details

Part of a series of events celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin.

http://darwin.st-andrews.ac.uk/

host: Dr Daniel Barker

refID: 433

hide details



29 Jan 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Seals, Ice and Volcanoes...
Sonja Heinrich & Clint Blight
SMRU

click for details

Clint and I have recently returned from a rather pleasant holiday alternative to St Andrews' grey cold dark Xmas. In this slide show we'll provide some optical explanations for why we're wearing such big smiles. We'll invite you on a brief visual journey to the Antarctic Peninsula (aboard the cruise ship Polar Star) featuring ice, penguins, rugged mountains, seals and whales, among other bits, and to the lofty tops of a couple of Chilean volcanoes that we climbed for some different ice experience. We'll throw in a few tales and photographic evidence of marine mammals encountered (alive or in intriguing skeletal form) along the way.

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 432

hide details



27 Jan 2009
4:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Eonfusion: a unique new software package for data integration and visualisation
Matt Wilson
Myriax Pty Ltd, Tasmania, Australia

click for details

Eonfusion is a software package for data integration, visualization and analysis of spatial and temporal data sets. It offers a quick, easy and effective solution for analysing and viewing large volumes of time-dependent data.

Flexible visualisation and data fusion provides the ability to: combine diverse data sets including GPS tracks, telemetry sensors, satellite imagery and environmental data sets; navigate through space and time, exploring relationships within and between data sets; elegantly fuse different data sets to test hypotheses.

Communication and collaboration are key goals of Eonfusion through shared visualisations, sharable methods (“data flows”) and a highly extensible feature set.

Matt Wilson from Myriax Pty Ltd in Tasmania, Australia will present Eonfusion, demonstrate example applications and answer questions.

host: tp14, mjc16

refID: 430

hide details



15 Jan 2009
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Loud but hard-to-see: Detection functions combining acoustic and visual information
Jason Matthiopoulos
SMRU

click for details

18 Dec 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

SMRU phone tags on harbour seals in northern Norway: Past & Future projects
Virginie Ramasco
Institute of Marine Research, Norway

click for details

12 Dec 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Ecology and sympatry of coastal dolphins on the west coast of Southern Africa
Simon Elwen
Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria

click for details

11 Dec 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Echolocation-based foraging by harbor porpoises and sperm whales, including effects of noise and acoustic propagation
Stacy de Ruiter
Service Acoustique et Sismique IFREMER - Centre de Brest, France

click for details

host: tp14, pm29

refID: 411

hide details



09 Dec 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Pregnancy, Paddy and the Pribilofs
Paddy Pomeroy
SMRU

click for details

04 Dec 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Health care associated infections (HCAI) - can we reduce their incidence?
Prof Curtis Gemmell

click for details

host: Dr Peter Bryant

refID: 408

hide details



04 Dec 2008
1:20 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

South Georgia in pictures - Oct/Nov 2008
Susan Gallon
SMRU

click for details

04 Dec 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Mozambique's prawn trawl fishery: A case study of the Maputo Bay export industry
Theoni Photopoulos
SMRU

click for details

01 Dec 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Social information transmission in meerkat societies
Dr. Alex Thornton
Dept of Zoology, University of Cambridge

click for details

27 Nov 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Re-evaluating the population structure of bottlenose dolphins around the United Kingdom
Valentina Islas
SMRU

click for details

20 Nov 2008
1:30 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Layers of change: stable isotope variation in the biogenic hardparts of two marine predators
Nora Hanson
SMRU/Geosciences

click for details

20 Nov 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Killer whales in the UK? - preliminary results from the Shetland Islands
Volker Deecke
SMRU

click for details

17 Nov 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Nematode comparative genomics: are nematode genomes weird?
Professor Mark Blaxter
Inst. of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh

click for details

10 Nov 2008
1:20 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Blainville’s Beaked Whale Vocalisations
Charlotte Dunn
SMRU/Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation (BMMRO)

click for details

10 Nov 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Designing a shipboard line transect survey to estimate cetacean abundance off the Azores Archipelago, Portugal
Claudia Faustino
SMRU Ltd

click for details

06 Nov 2008
1:20 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Cetacean stock assessment in relation to Exploration and Production industry sound
Len Thomas
CREEM

click for details

Data suitable for detecting trends in cetacean populations are sparse;
monitoring cetaceans is not straightforward, many species are wide-ranging and not easily observed at sea and a number of techniques for estimating cetacean abundance have been developed. The objective of this project is to identify cetacean populations for which trends can be detected and to then subsequently explore the relationship between those trends and sound from oil and gas exploration and production. A database of abundance estimates was constructed following an extensive review of the primary literature. A ‘global’ analysis, based on 1035 abundance estimates of 34 species, aimed to identify whether cetacean density varied with taxonomic, spatial, methodological and temporal differences. Generalised additive models (GAMs) were used to fit flexible smooth functions to the response variable, cetacean density, which was weighted for survey size and precision. Cetacean density varied most between species, suggesting that to reveal trends species should be considered individually. The density of the seven most data rich species (minke, fin, sperm, humpback and long-finned pilot whales, striped dolphins and harbour porpoise) was each modelled in turn. The most significant explanatory variables varied between species and area. Power analysis showed that the probability of detecting anything but the largest trends in density was low. For the seven species, the mean estimated CV for the population change index was 0.85, at which level a decline or increase in population size of half an order of magnitude would be detectable with a power of 0.8. The next step is to analyse available oil and gas exploration and production sound data using the model framework. Knowledge of population trends is vital for informing management decisions, particularly those relating to conservation and the mitigation of anthropogenic impacts. Behavioural and physiological responses of cetaceans to seismic surveys will be considered and recommendations will be made to ensure future data collection methods increase ability to assess population trends.

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 406

hide details



06 Nov 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

DECAF – Density Estimation for Cetaceans from passive Acoustic Fixed sensors
Len Thomas
CREEM

click for details

DECAF is a 3-year research project aimed at developing and implementing
statistical methods for estimating cetacean density from fixed passive acoustic
sensors.  Passive acoustics is increasingly being recognized as a useful and
practical modality for gathering information about cetaceans, and there is a
growing body of research on the use of towed acoustic arrays to estimate
density, either alone or in conjunction with more traditional visual surveys.
However, fixed hydrophones present additional challenges: issues include animal movement, lack of random placement of detectors and inability under some circumstances to localize the animal vocalizations.  In this research, we aim to provide a sound statistical framework to address these issues in ways that will have very general applicability.  Our approach is to proceed via a series of linked case studies, using data from US Navy instrumented testing ranges. To date we have focused largely on the estimation of beaked whale density from the Atlantic Undersea test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC, located in the Bahamas).  We have also begun working on estimation of sperm whale density at AUTEC and minke whale density at  the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF, located off the east coast of Kaua’i, Hawai’i). Further details of our work and research outputs is given at our project web site: http://www.creem.st-and.ac.uk/decaf

host: Dr Theoni Photopoulou

refID: 405

hide details



03 Nov 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

The Evolution of Speech: A Comparative, Physiological Approach
Dr. Tecumseh Fitch
School of Psychology, University of Saint Andrews

click for details

31 Oct 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Sterilizing diseases and range limits: cuckoo-bees and anther-smuts
Professor Janis Antonovics FRS, Lewis and Clark Professor of Biology
University of Virginia

click for details

host:  Professor Thomas R. Meagher

reception:  8:00PM, home of Tom & Laura Meagher

references:

Antonovics, J. 2005. Plant venereal diseases: insights from a messy
metaphor. New Phytologist 165: 71-80.

Antonovics, J., Abbate, J.L., Baker, C. H., Daley, D., Hood, M. E.,
Jenkins, C. E., Johnson, L. J., Murray, J. J., Panjeti, V., Volker H. W.
Rudolf, V. W. H., Sloan, D., Joanna Vondrasek, J. 2007. Evolution by any
other name: antibiotic resistance and avoidance of the e-word. PLOS
Biology 5: e30.

Rudolf, V., and Antonovics, J. 2007. Disease transmission by cannibalism:
rare event or common occurrence? Proceedings of the Royal Society of
London, Series B 274:1205-10.

host: Mrs Joyce Strachan

refID: 395

hide details



30 Oct 2008
1:30 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Mixing of water masses in the Baltic Sea
Gunda Wieczorek
Leibniz Institute of Baltic Sea Research

click for details

30 Oct 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

The hormonal control of osmoregulation in weaned grey seals
Ailsa Hall
SMRU

click for details

23 Oct 2008
1:20 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Acoustic Cetacean Monitoring. How and Why?
Doug Gillespie
SMRU

click for details

23 Oct 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Estimating whale abundance using sea-bed mounted hydrophone arrays
Danielle Harris
CREEM/SMRU

click for details

20 Oct 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Bat echolocation: an evolutionary approach
Professor Gareth Jones
School of Biological Sciences, U of Bristol

click for details

16 Oct 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Robust predictions from opportunistic data: porpoise habitat in SW Wales
Saana Isojunno
SMRU

click for details

10 Oct 2008
1:20 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

TBA
Charlotte Dunn
SMRU

click for details

08 Oct 2008
4:00 PM
The Observatory
Seminar Room

Particle filtering seals: An update on modelling the population dynamics of grey seals
Len Thomas
CREEM

click for details

This talk presents an update on ongoing work, aimed at using particle filtering algorithms to fit Bayesian state-space models for the population dynamics of British and Canadian grey seals to data on the number of pups born each year.  The model for British seals now fits the data reasonably well; that for Canadian seals is rather less impressive, but I’m the man with the plan (well, we have some ideas, anyway).  There have also been lots of recent developments in the sphere of fitting high-dimensional models to data using computer-intensive methods, and I’ll provide some pointers to these.

host: tp14, cgp2

refID: 362

hide details



06 Oct 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Aspiring to find out what goes ‘bump in the night': accessing wildlife secrets using animal-attached technology
Professor Rory Wilson
of Environment and Society, Swansea University

click for details

First EEB seminar of the fall term!

host: Dr Patrick Miller

refID: 358

hide details



27 May 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Seal-salmon interactions
Isla Graham and Stuart Middlemas
SMRU and FRS

click for details

01 May 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Ecosystem-based management for fisheries
Mariano Koen-Alonso
Department of Fisheries and Oceans (St John's, Newfoundland, Canada)

click for details

29 Apr 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Between a rock and a rough place: living on the edge at Bouvet Island
Martin Biuw
Norwegian Polar Institute

click for details

28 Apr 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Using a Multi-level Approach to Studying Sexually Selected Traits in Swordtails
Professor Alexandra Basolo
Biological Science, University of Nebraska

click for details

24 Apr 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

A method for smoothing noisy telemetry data
Mike Lonergan
Sea Mammal Research Unit, University of St Andrews

click for details

Abstract

System ARGOS is widely used to track marine mammals. Satellites measure the Doppler shift in signals from low powered transmitters attached to animals and use this to estimate their locations. The interpretation of this data is complicated by the irregular intervals at which locations are estimated, which require a suitable satellite being overhead while the tag is at the surface, and the large and non-gaussian errors in the estimates. We demonstrate software for extracting animal tracks from this data that provides a way to utilise location information of all qualities and estimate animal locations between observations. Code to fit the paths is available in gampath, an R library. Within this, animals’ paths in the north-south and east-west directions are represented with separate cubic splines, removing the requirement to assume that animals turn corners at either fixed times or when location estimates are made. The splines are fitted by penalised regression with a common quadratic penalty (smoothing parameter), and parameters for t-distributions describing the fat-tailed locational errors for each ARGOS quality class estimated with the R library gamlss. The method is applied to data from hybrid GPS/ARGOS tags attached to two grey seals (/Halichoerus grypus/) at Abertay Sands on the East Coast of Scotland. These operated for 131 and 152 days, producing 1741 and 1040 ARGOS locations respectively. The smoothed tracks are compared with 731 and 590 GPS locations, and estimate 95% of the locations to within 9.5km and 22 km. (The equivalent values for a speed-filter are 15 and 30km.)

host: Mr Arliss Winship

refID: 296

hide details



20 Mar 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Overview of the 2002 PDV epidemic and life history of harbour seals in the Netherlands
Fiona Read
University of Vigo, Galicia

click for details

28 Feb 2008
1:00 PM
SOI
Lecture Theatre

Overview of the Protected Species Programme at Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Gordon Waring
U.S. N.M.F.S Southeast Fisheries Science Center

click for details

11 Feb 2008
4:00 PM
Bute
Lecture Theatre D

Sleep in the Sea and in the Air
Dr. Niels Rattenborg
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology

click for details







click to display current seminars list